Alou’s the One!

“Nixon’s the One!”

This campaign slogan became reality on election night in 1968. Richard Nixon was a genuine baseball fan, but the new President may have found reading the standings a little “tricky,” since Major League Baseball launched the second wave of expansion and divisional play in ‘69. The American League replaced the recently-departed Athletics with the Royals in Kansas City and ventured into uncharted territory with the Seattle Pilots. The National League followed suit by planting the Expos north of boarder in Montreal and the Padres just over the border from Mexico in San Diego.

In part to accommodate the four new teams, Topps produced its largest set to date: 664 cards. Also, (after a lengthy battle,) they reached an agreement with the Major League Baseball Players’ Association, thus allowing photographers to capture the infant clubs in their new uniforms and caps. However, these photos didn’t appear until the fifth series, so it’s bare headshots and airbrushed insignia in the first four series.

Alou

Ironically, the first Expos card (#22) features a player who never played for Montreal: Jesus Alou. Many of you remember that the youngest Alou brother was sent to Houston as part of the deal that salvaged the Rusty Staub trade, after Donn Clendenon refused to report to the Astros.

Cline

The first card depicting an Expo in the “tri-color beanie” is Ty Cline at #442. The journeyman Cline will end up with the Reds in ’70 and play a key role in defeating Pittsburgh in that season’s NLCS. Other Expos shown in the new uniforms in the 1969 set are: #466 Boccabella, #496 Jaster, #524 Rookie Stars: Laboy/Wicker, #549 Brand, #578 Bosch, #625 Mack Jones and #646 Rookie Stars: McGinn/Morton.

McBean

Drafted by the Padres from Pittsburgh, pitcher Al McBean has the honor of being Topps’ initial “Friar” with card #14.   The Virgin Island native was only a Padre briefly. After appearing in one game, he was dealt to Dodgers in April of ’69.

Ferrara  

Veteran Dodger outfielder Al Ferrara is the first player to don the Padres distinctive brown and gold on card #452. Al was a starter during the first two seasons, proving to be one of the Padres most consistent hitters. Of course, Ferrara’s biggest claim to fame is appearing on TV in episodes of “Batman” and “Gilligan’s Island.” Other players in authentic Padres uniforms that year are: #506 Rookie Stars: Breeden/Roberts, #637 Rookie Stars: Davanon/Reberger/Kirby and #659 Johnny Podres. Yes, Podres of the Padres.

Morehead

Former Red Sox phenom Dave Morehead holds the distinction of being the inaugural Royals card at #29. Morehead tossed a no-hitter against Cleveland in ’65 but a shoulder injury derailed a promising career. Dave lasted two seasons with Kansas City before his release in ’71.

Ribant

Card # 463 shows pitcher Dennis Ribant in a Royals uniform from spring training ’69. But, Dennis never wore the royal blue during the championship season, since he was traded to the Cardinals before the late in spring training. Other “real” Royals: #508 Drabowsky, #529 Kirkpatrick, #558 Burgmeier, #569 Billy Harris, #591 Hedlund, #619 Rookie Stars: Pat Kelly, #632 Warden, #647 Wickersham and #662 Rookie Stars: Drago/Spriggs/Oliver.

Marshall

It goes without saying that I could prattle on about the Seattle Pilots incessantly. So, I will self-edit and limit my commentary about the first Pilots player on a card: Mike Marshall (#17). The eccentric Marshall was in the Pilots original starting rotation but struggled, resulting in a demotion to the minors. Marshall eventually becomes a multi-inning relief pitcher, winning the Cy Young for the Dodgers in ’74, appearing in a record 106 games.

Gosger

By the time I “ripped wax” on the pack containing card #482, Jim Gosger was probably already traded to the Mets-having been sent as the “player to be name later” for Greg Goosen. Jim is pictured wearing the basic Pilots spring training uniform. The undeniably unique uniforms, complete with captains’ stripes and “scrambled eggs” on the cap bills, would not debut until opening day. There are five other “immortals” who are photographed as Pilots: #534 McNertney, #563 Pattin, #612 Aker, #631 Kennedy and #651 Gil.

Although a “silent majority” of blog readers wishes they could “kick me around some more” for continuing this series, I will not allow my topic judgement to be “impeached.” Thus, “resign” yourselves to the coming third installment and “pardon” my obsession.

In closing, if you decide to purchase some of these cards, make sure to buy only from trusted sellers. After all, you want a dealer who can proclaim: “I am not a crook.”

 

 

Author: Tim Jenkins

Sports memorablilia collector with Seattle teams emphasis. HOF autographs, baseball cards and much more. Teacher for over 30 years. Attended games at 35 different MLB parks.

4 thoughts on “Alou’s the One!”

  1. Nixon would have read the standings because only Nixon could read the standings! He was never a quitter just like the 1969 Mets. I love the cards from that era. There is still a pre-Watergate innocence in those Topps photos.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s