Cha-Cha and the Circle K

Cepeda_1985 Circle K

You know how it goes.  For me it was several years ago — I think it was at the Long Beach SABR event — when I came across a baseball card bearing the image of Orlando Cepeda, one of my favorite players.  The card was not your typical Topps product, but I didn’t care.  I thought it looked interesting, so I bought it for a few of bucks.  I tucked it away in a book that I had just bought as well, and promptly forgot about it.  It happens!

Not too long ago, I was sorting through a few baseball books and came across the Cepeda card.  “Oh yeah,” I said to myself, renewing my interest, now with a little more clarity and frame of mind.  I wondered a bit more about the card.  Here’s what I got:

The Cepeda card is #24 of a 33-card Topps set distributed in 1985 exclusively by Circle K, the convenience store chain.  The set reminded me of the Woolworth set I wrote about last year.  This series featured all-time home run hitters, with Hank Aaron occupying the top spot, of course.  Other players include Willie Mays (#3), Billy Williams (#18), Mike Schmidt (#19), and Norm Cash (#25).  Interestingly, because Topps could not come to an agreement with Joe DiMaggio, who was 31st on the all-time home run list in 1985, his card was omitted from the set.  Consequently, the series list skips #31, going from #30 to #32.

Aside from his photo, the card indicates Cepeda’s name and nothing else.  No position, no cute graphic.  Just a serious, albeit young-looking, Cepeda photo, probably in the early stages of his career with the San Francisco Giants.  The reverse side of the card in blue and red ink, features a run down of his MLB career with a highlight noting his Rookie of the Year Award in 1958, and 1967 NL MVP Award.  The Circle K logo is featured prominently in the upper left side, with the Topps logo and card number to the upper right.

I don’t have a lot of specialty cards such as this, so I’ll just keep this one displayed somewhere on a shelf.  It will remind me of when Cha-Cha ruled the City by the Bay. And maybe if something else catches my eye at a SABR conference, I won’t forget about it for years at a time!

 

Author: sabrlatino

Anthony Salazar is the chair for SABR's Latino baseball committee, and editor of its publication, "La Prensa del Béisbol Latino." He has written on the Latino experience in the national pastime, and has consulted with baseball teams, museums and programs looking to tap into the US Latino market.

One thought on “Cha-Cha and the Circle K”

  1. I am lucky enough to own the complete set. It came in a cardboard box, pretty much the same size as a standard deck of playing cards. The checklist, on the box, did list DiMaggio, with an asterisk/comment, “Picture card not included in series.” The beneficiary of DiMaggio’s exclusion was Lee May, #34. Given that this was something of a “history” issue, it is interesting how the intervening years have changed the Horner list. Ernie Banks and Eddie Mathews, for instance, in that series tied for 10th all-time, have slipped all the way down to 23rd. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

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