Topps “Bunt 20” E-Cards Are Here

 

The Topps “Bunt 20” smartphone app for digital/electronic baseball cards is here, replacing “Bunt 19.”

I am a latecomer to Bunt. Even though it has been around since 2012, I didn’t even know of the app’s existence until December 2019, when I read a posting about it by Nick Vossbrink here on the SABR Baseball Cards Blog (and a write-up by Jenny Miller that Nick linked to).

Once I joined in December 2019, though, I became a regular user. I initially was going on  daily, as one received gold coins—the free currency for acquiring cards—every day, plus bonus amounts for activity every seven consecutive days. Once my gold-coin total started exceeding 100,000 and my card collection approached 2,000, however, I cut back to going on every two or three days.

Like Jenny, I have not spent any of my own money on Bunt, relying on gold coins. Diamonds, which can be exchanged for apparently more ritzy products, carry a fee. I have simple tastes, enjoying the sharp photograph quality of Bunt cards and the process of collecting by team. Other than trying a couple of trades (which failed), I have not gotten into any of the more elaborate aspects of Bunt, such as its fantasy-type games.

Anyway, I started wondering recently when (and how) the transition from Bunt 19 to Bunt 20 would occur. Last Friday, March 13, it happened. When I tapped the Bunt 19 app on my phone, it said the Bunt 20 reader was ready for download.

Bunt 20 features some changes compared to Bunt 19. Users can claim gold coins not only immediately upon entering the app, but also after waiting periods (e.g., 10 minutes or 1 hour). One can also claim a “Mystery Box” upon entering, which basically just seems to be a small number of cards. I’m sure there are additional differences between Bunt 20 and 19, which I’ll notice after additional use.

One thing that took me a while to get used to when I first started using Bunt is the probabilistic nature of some of the special deals in the “store.” You’ll see a feature advertised, such as cards with photos from Players’ Weekend or historical greats, but when you buy a packet, there may be one or none of the thematic cards.

My least favorite aspect of Bunt is the large amount of duplicate cards you get. They clutter up your team-by-team collections (if you choose to organize your digital cards that way) and, unless you want to use them for trading, they serve no useful purpose. I am not aware of any way to delete duplicate cards.

Ultimately, for its cost—which is nothing, unless one wants to purchase diamonds and fancier cards—Bunt is definitely a fun way to fill some down time.

Author: alanreifman

Professor at Texas Tech University and author of "Hot Hand: The Statistics Behind Sports' Greatest Streaks."

3 thoughts on “Topps “Bunt 20” E-Cards Are Here”

  1. I certainly respect anyone who enjoys collecting Bunt; we live in an ever-evolving technological and cultural world, and if digital cards can bring in a new generation of collectors, more power to it. The important thing is to have fun with whatever you collect, in whatever way you collect it.

    That having been said, I can’t imagine myself ever being interested in amassing a digital collection. If I can’t put my hands on it, if it doesn’t exist beyond an image on a screen, it just doesn’t do it for me. I need the tactile connection and the physical representation. I’m sure that’s a generational thing, but it is what it is 🙂

    Like

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