Juan’s Double Prints

In several previous posts (too many for most of you!), I have highlighted Topps’ tendency to recycle photos.  The Major League Baseball Players Association boycott of Topps in 1967-68 exacerbated this practice, but earlier examples abound.  My latest obsession is focused on the 1960s cards of Juan Marichal.

In either 1960 or 1961, a photo session took place in San Francisco at Candlestick Park, which opened in 1960.  The photographer captured three different poses of Marichal.  The photos are distinctive due to Juan’s white undershirt.

Since the undergarment does not have a collar, it appears to be a rubberized jacket seen frequently on vintage cards whose photos were taken in spring training.  The shirt was designed to help “burn off” fat accumulated over the winter. However, in this instance, the slender Dominican is undoubtedly using it for insulation, to ward off the Arctic like conditions at Candlestick Park. Also, it is a good bet that Marichal was not starting that evening.  The white sleeves would have been deceptive to the hitters.

The first use of the white sleeve photos shows up on Juan’s 1962 card. He is shown with his arms above his head.  1963 has Juan in a slightly turned stretch position.  The small black and white photo on the 1963 card reuses the 1962 picture.

In 1964, the third pose is used.  This straight on shot turns up on Juan’s “Stand Up” card as well.  The 1962 image makes a comeback on the Pitching Leaders card, while the 1963 Topps pose is used on the Wheaties Stamp.

Topps was far from done using the photos.  The 1964 image turns up on the 1968 checklist as well as Juan’s Bazooka cards from 1965 and 1968. Meanwhile the 1963 Topps pose turns up on the 1967 checklist and 1965 Pitching Leaders card.

We are not done yet.  The 1962 photo spans the decades and appears on the 1970 Pitching Leaders card.

Sometime prior to 1965, Topps snapped three additional photos, probably in spring training.  Although it is hard to prove definitively, the pictures were probably taken at the same time, due to the mock turtleneck undershirt in all three.

Topps will recycle two of the three portraits.  Juan’s partially turned headshot is found on the 1965 card, the 1966 ERA Leaders, the 1967 ERA and Pitching Leaders cards, and the 1967 poster insert. The same image returns on the Deckle Edge insert in 1969.

The second photo, depicting Marichal holding a ball, is used on the 1964 coin insert and the 1966 Bazooka.

The third image may be the best of all.  The 1964 “Giant” shows a smiling Juan.  I could not find another instance of this one being reused.

Topps put out the recycling again, using a newer photo taken a Candlestick.  It is used on the 1967 and 1968 cards, the 1969 Pitching Leaders and the 1969 and 1970 Transogram.

Of course, Juan Marichal is not unique in having reused images.  The League Leader cards have many duplicate images of star players.  I still find it interesting that an image can show up eight years after it first appeared.

Author: Tim Jenkins

Sports memorablilia collector with Seattle teams emphasis. HOF autographs, baseball cards and much more. Teacher for over 30 years. Attended games at 35 different MLB parks.

8 thoughts on “Juan’s Double Prints”

  1. I met Juan Marichal at a card show. My friend and I talked to him for more than one hour. He told us many things about playing baseball especially against the Dodgers and about his daughter, son-law and family. He is the only baseball player I ever involved in long conversation with.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My favorite Giant by far—-and I have many I like as a fan since 1959. Many recall Juan’s debut vs. the Phillies on my mom’s 35th birthday (a one hitter, a Clay Dalrymple grounder on the middle the only flaw). But that day in Giant history is significant for another, more controversial reason—9 years earlier to the day in 1951, Leo Durocher introduced the squad to the “buzzer stealing system” and all concurred save Whitey Lockman. The effectiveness may be debated, but gratefully the 51 squad was not tossed on the heap of suspended players/managers as the Astros were. Juan’s debut meant the Giants had to send a player down and that was Willie McCovey. Can anyone out there name an instance in ML history when one future HOFer was brought up and another sent down in his place (Mc returned within weeks from Tacoma and of course never left ther bigs again). Have those two cards in question. —one autographed—and yes, he is the nicest signer I ever met (He added 6/15/63 to his personalized autograph on the photo Mom took of him on Camera Day 1963 when he ran on the field to pitch his no-no). What a true gentleman! Viva Juan! Gracias!

    Bill Klink
    Sun City, AZ

    Like

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