Walter Moved Quick and Horace Jumped to Candlestick

The New York Giants’ and Brooklyn Dodgers’ franchise shifts to the West Coast for the 1958 season is well chronicled. “White flight” to the suburbs, aging ballparks, and lack of parking all factored into Giants’ President Horace Stoneham, and Dodgers’ “Prexy” Walter O’Malley decamping to sunny California. Of course, the prospect of huge, untapped markets and new stadiums warmed the “cockles” of the two moguls as well.

The National League officially approved the franchise shifts on August 19, 1957. Topps-though probably bummed that their prime locations for NL photos (Ebbets Field and Polo Grounds) were gone-had plenty of lead time to produce ’58 cards for San Francisco and Los Angeles.

58 Mays

In the spring of ’58, young San Franciscans jumped on the nearest cable car and headed for Woolworth’s, Newberry’s or the candy store to buy wax packs in hope of finding cards embossed with “San Fran. Giants.” The youngsters received a real “San Francisco treat” when they discovered that Willie Mays was the first card Topps produced for the transplanted club (#5 in the set’s numerical sequence).

58 Kirkland

Obviously, Mays’s cap has an airbrushed interlocking “SF.” The artist probably made an educated guess on the emblem’s appearance by using the PCL Seals cap logo as a source. The airbrushed “SF” is found on the majority of the ‘58 cards and fluctuates in size and thickness.

Most likely, the first card with an authentic “SF” is that of pitcher Paul Giel (#308). The emblem is the right font and size. Plus, this ’58 Jay Publishing photo-taken in spring training- appears to be from the same session.

 

If you are skeptical of Giel’s photo being the “real McCovey,” there is no doubt the Orlando Cepeda (#343) is authentic. As you can see, the accompanying photo-taken during ’58 spring training-is identical to the card photo.

Other “real” San Francisco Giants are Jim Davenport (#413) and Ray Monzant (#447). By the way, Monzant actually has two cards in the ’58 set, since Mike McCormick’s card features Ray’s photo.

58 Neal

The first Dodgers card Angelino youngsters may have pulled from their packs was Charlie Neal (#16). Not quite as awe inspiring as Mays but a major leaguer, nonetheless. The airbrushed “LA” is a decent approximation of the real one but doesn’t quite match. As with the Giants, the artist may have been using the PCL Angels emblem as a guide. 

Collectors had to settle for airbrushed “LAs” on Drysdale, Reese, Hodges, Snyder and other familiar names before finding the first actual Los Angeles cap on the noggin of Danny McDevitt (#357). The emblem has the correct length of the horizontal part of the “L,” and the flourish on the tip is correct. The photo is almost identical to one taken in spring training for a team set by Dodgers concessionaire, Danny Goodman.

Pignatano

Joe Pignatano (#373) appears to be the only other Dodger with an authentic “LA” on the cap. The photo is also nearly identical to the one used for the Goodman set.

If you believe my conclusions are pure “California dreamin’,” let me know. I would rather be corrected than “stuck in Lodi, again,” with wrong suppositions.

 

 

 

 

Proof(s) of the Mythical Rookies

71 all star bowa fixed

The number of Topps’ test issues and prototypes that didn’t see production in the ‘60s and ‘70s never ceases to amaze me.  Recently, I stumbled across an image of a Larry Bowa from a set that may be one of the rarest of the post-war era.  At first, I thought this was a “do-it-yourself” card, but a little research revealed the it to be mysterious and highly coveted collectible.

In ’71, a Topps’ designer created 10 artist’s proofs for a set called All-Star Rookies.  Apparently, only one set of 10 prototypes were produced.  The players featured earned the Rookie Star designation for the ’70 season and, thus, have a trophy on their base cards in ‘71.  The set was probably intended for the annual Topps Rookie Stars banquet.  Paul Ember had an excellent three-part post on this topic.

71 all star munson fixed

For over 30 years, only a black and white image of Thurman Munson’s card existed as proof of the mythical set.  This image was used to illustrate the set in The Standard Catalog of Vintage Baseball Cards.  Collectors theorized that a collector acquired the cards in the ‘70s and kept them under wraps.

71 all star carbo fixed

Then, in 2011, Topps historian David Hornish posted photos of all 10 cards on the Topps Archives website.  Later, the Bowa and Carbo cards were made available at an auction.

In the conventional sense, these are not truly cards.  The proofs consist of a standard card glued to a thick piece of artist’s board measuring 9-1/2 X 6-1/2.  The disembodied head shots are Kodachrome photos pasted on the card background.  Photos would have been taken to produce the image used on actual cards.

The photos appear to be unique to the set apart from John Ellis. The open mouth shot is the same as the photo on the 1970 Yankees Rookie Stars card.

Gio's Stickers.jpg

Incidentally, Gio (@wthballs), who mans the fantastic blog “When Topps Had Balls,” creates great retro-card sets.  His wonderful “gelatin” set-which paid tribute to the ‘60s cards on the back of Jell-O packages-contained bonus stickers inspired by the ’71 Topps Rookie Stars set.

I’m sure the Red Sox collectors amongst us are willing to mortgage their houses if the Billy Conigliaro and Bernie Carbo cards ever surface at an auction.   I don’t think I’ll be “able” to go after Cain, however.

 

Sources

Robert Edward Auctions | Circa 1920s Leather Football Helmet Signed by Jim Thorpe and Red Grange, www.robertedwardauctions.com/auction/2015/spring/690/extremely-rare-1971-topps-all-star-rookie-artists-proofs-larry-bowa/.

The Standard Catalog of Vintage Baseball Cards

 

 

 

Win with Vinegar Bend!

To celebrate the end of another election cycle, I decided to merge two of my passions: cards and politics. This post will highlight players who had post-baseball careers as politicians but is by no means a definitive list. So, it’s time to toss my cap in the “fungo” circle and head out on the “hustings.”

87-89 old judge tener 2

The first player turned solon we will examine is Pittsburgh native John Tener. He pitched for Cap Anson’s Chicago White Stockings and the Players’ League Pittsburgh team from 1888-1890. After baseball, he became a business man and was eventually elected to Congress in 1908. His stint in the House of Representatives was short, due to being nominated to run as a Republican for Governor of Pennsylvania in 1910. John won the “gubernatorial nod,” but decided one chief executive job wasn’t enough.

87-89 old judge tener 1

Tener accepted the National Leagues offer to become league president in 1913. He insisted on only working part-time and not receiving a salary until his tenure as Governor ended in 1915. I’m sure this arrangement never resulted in conflicts of interest.

1910 American Caramel E91-C

Once the “Big Train,” Walter Johnson, bid the diamond adieu, he took a turn at elective office. Johnson won a seat on the Montgomery County, Maryland Board of Commissioners in 1938. His effort to use this position as springboard to Congress failed when he ran as a Republican and lost in the 1940 general election.

 

Best known for tossing 8 2/3 innings of hitless relief in 1917 after the starter-Babe Ruth-was ejected, Ernie Shore sought to bring law and order to Forsyth County, NC after his playing day ended. Shore served as the elected Sheriff for 36 years from 1934-70.

56 Mizell

Another “Tar Heel” who put down the “horsehide” to “glad hand” the populace was Wilmer “Vinegar Bend” Mizell. The former Cardinal and Pirate “twirler” served in the US House of Representatives from 1969-75.

67 Bunning

The fine folks of Kentucky liked Jim Bunning’s “pitch” well enough to elected him to the House five times and the Senate twice. The Hall-of-Fame pitcher served in Congress from 1986-2010.

67 Jackson

Bunnings teammate and fellow starting pitcher, Larry Jackson, also become a politician.   Jackson was a five term Representative in the Idaho state house. He entered the Republican gubernatorial primary in 1978 but lost.

83 Edler

Little known infielder, Dave Edler, had a brief career with the Mariners in the early ‘80s. Dave became the Mayor of Yakima, WA-the “big” city near my home town.

85 Crabtree Bass

Randy Bass, the man closely tied to the “Curse of Colonel Sanders,” served as a Democrat in the Oklahoma Senate from 2004 to the present. Bass was a key figure in helping the Hanshin Tigers when the Japan Series Championship in 1985.

In the aftermath of the victory, a wild celebration ensued in which the fiberglass vestige of Colonel Sanders was taken from a KFC store and tossed into the river by a Tigers fan under the influence of more than “eleven herbs and spices.” Randy’s girth resembled that of the Colonel, which is what prompted the fan to “borrow” the statue. Alas, the Tigers have failed to win another Championship for 32 years, due to the “Kentucky Fried Curse.”

67 Jarvis

We can’t have a discussion of politicians without including corruption, indictment and conviction. Former Braves pitcher Pat Jarvis was the Sheriff of De Kalb County, Georgia from 1976-95. He was convicted of taking over $200,000 in kick-backs from a jail construction contractor. Jarvis served 15 months in Federal prison for his misdeeds.

Who knows which current or recent player will enter the political arena next? Perhaps Jose Canseco will launch Senatorial campaign with a “war on drugs” focus. Brice Harper might try to woo the millennial “bro” vote. In any case, you can expect some “appeals to the base,” late rallies and high “spin” rates.

 

The Elephants Walk

By 1955, the two dynastic periods of the Philadelphia Athletics were fading in the collective memories of the A’s dwindling fanbase. The popularity of the Phillies “Wiz Kids,” persistent losing, family power struggles and mounting debts all contributed to the “pachyderms” packing up and “goin’ to Kansas City.” For the full story behind the franchise transfer, I highly recommend Jeff Katz’s book: The Kansas City A’s and the Wrong Half of the Yankees and the SABR Fall 2010 “Baseball Research Journal” account by Robert Warrington: “Departure Without Dignity.”

The American League approved the sale of the Athletics and the move to Kansas City on November 8, 1954 — which gave Topps and Bowman enough lead time to make sure their A’s baseball cards were designated as Kansas City. Neither company appears to have included an actual Kansas City card (photographed after the move) in their 1955 sets.

55 Dressed to the Nines

Kansas City’s uniforms were changed in several ways from the ones wore by Philadelphia in ’54. Most significantly, the main accent color was changed to navy blue from the traditional royal blue. The year before the move saw the A’s switch to a script Athletics with red trim on the uniforms — instead of the traditional “Old English A.” The distinctive “A” remained on the cap but with a red outline.  This design was continued in the Midwest, but a yoke was added on both home and road uniforms and the cap “A” was changed to red. Lastly, a sleeve patch-with the “white elephant” logo — now featuring the pachyderm on top of a ball — was added to the new duds.

55 Topps Finigan

Jim Finigan is the first Kansas City card and features the airbrushed red and white “KC” on the cap. Topps anticipation that the team would want to represent the new city did not prove prescient. The A’s would not adopt “KC” for the cap insignia until ’60. Note that Finigan is pictured in a ’54 royal blue accented Philadelphia uniform, without the yoke piping or sleeve patch.

55 Topps Limmer

One might believe that Lou Limmer’s “in action” could be authentic, since the photo shows him in a yoked uniform. However, this is a pre-1954 A’s uniform that had the chest piping, since Lou never played in Kansas City.

main_1490385002-1955-Topps-Double-Header-15-Rube-Walker-16-Lou-Limmer-PristineAuction.com

As an aside, I discovered this odd ’55 Topps Double Header card for Limmer. The Double Header set features two colorized player photos on opposite sides of the card. When folded, the legs of the player on the front serve as the legs of player on the back. Lou is coupled with Rube Walker-and his legs. Topps has drawn on the “KC” emblem, but the photo used as a model is from ’51, since Lou is wearing the “Golden Anniversary” patch worn by the AL teams that season.

55 Bowman Shantz Bros

Bowman bowed out of the card business after producing the wonderful “Color TV” set in ’55. Apart from two cards, all the Bowman cards feature the Athletics wearing the royal blue and red home uniforms from ’54. Many of the cards in this set are taken at Connie Mack Stadium in Philadelphia, the home city of Bowman.

55 Bowman Boudreau

The before mentioned two oddities are cards for Manager Lou Boudreau and Cloyd Boyer. Both have dark caps with poorly rendered red A insignia on the caps. Boudreau’s photo is probably from his stint as manager of the Red Sox. The dugout pose is like his ’53 Bowman card.

56 Astroth

56 Lopez

So, it was up to Topps to produce the first true Kansas City Athletics card in ’56. As you might expect there are caveats. Card #14 in the numerical sequence is that of Hector Lopez. He was a rookie with Kansas City in ’55 and never played in Philadelphia. The “in action” pose clearly shows Hector in a KC uniform, complete with yoke and the “elephant on a ball” shoulder patch. But, the “colorizer” painted his cap “A” white, instead of red. Topps finally comes through with a proper cap on card #106: Joe Astroth.

Since I want to make sure everything is up-to-date in Kansas City in terms of accuracy, please let me know if I earned an “F” instead of an “A” by missing an “elephant in the room.”

Though you may wish to give me the “bum’s rush” for continuing this blog series, I will next leave Kansas City from the corner of 12th Street and Vine and head to Brooklyn for look at the cards resulting from The Bums’ rush to LA.

 

They Went East — Not West — to the Orioles’ Nest

After World War II, the urban centers of the West Coast, Texas and Midwest saw tremendous population growth.  Los Angeles, San Francisco, Houston, Dallas, Minneapolis and Kansas City all set their sights on becoming “big league” sports markets.  So, naturally, the American League moved the failing St. Louis Browns to Baltimore before the 1954 campaign.

Several factors went into the decision to “go East,” not the least of which involved the desire to rid the league of Browns owner, Bill Veeck.  Ultimately, the AL only allowed the Browns to move if Veeck was out of the picture.  Thus, Veeck sold the Browns to a Baltimore ownership group, and the “Charm City” embraced the major league Orioles.

Since the announcement of the transfer occurred on September 28, 1953, Topps and Bowman had ample time to prepare Baltimore Orioles cards for the ’54 sets. Topps included cards with players/coaches wearing the new uniform and cap, but Bowman did not.  Both brands went with the minor league Orioles “body bird” on the cap, which was adopted by the major league team.  I’m not sure if this was a guess or known at the time.

54 Young

It is appropriate that Bobby Young was the first Orioles player in the Topps set, since the back of the card informs the reader that he is a Baltimore native.  The airbrushed black cap and positioning of the bird is not a bad representation of the actual cap. Bobby’s uniform is clearly airbrushed in the action pose.

Topps colorization process creates issues when attempting to determine the authenticity of the cap and uniform.  The artist or the printer inexplicably used blue for the cap color.  The natural inclination is to assume all the photos are ersatz Orioles. However, a closer examination reveals that at least four of the card photos are from ’54 spring training.  The “body bird” is correct on all, and three of the four cards have “in action” black and white photos featuring ’54 Orioles uniforms.

Jehosie Heard’s card provides the conclusive evidence.  The photo is the exact one used by the Orioles for the ‘54 team issued, picture packs. Also, the photos were colorized and used for the ’54 Esskay Hot Dog set.  I couldn’t locate an Esskay card for Heard, even though the “Trading Card Database” lists one.  Dick Kryhoski and Harry Brecheen have card photos that look as if they were taken in the same photo session. Also, coach Tom Oliver is wearing the ’54 livery.

54 Spring Training

At first, I was perplexed by the fact that the striping on the stirrups didn’t match that worn in the regular season.  This conundrum is explained by examining photos from spring training in Yuma, Arizona, which clearly shows players sporting wide stripes.

 

 

54 Bowman Hunter

William “Billy” Hunter’s card demonstrates that Bowman’s artists had some interesting takes on how the uniforms might look.  He has ORIOLES painted in orange block letters with a bird above the “O” on his jersey front.

Lenhardt Bow 54

Most of the Bowman’s Orioles feature the “two birds on a bat” concept employed by the AAA International League Orioles.  This is rendered well on the Don Lenhardt and Duane Pillette cards.

On the other hand, Clint “The Toy Bulldog” Courtney and Johnny Groth have lettering and bat size issues.  Also, it must be noted that the Bowman artist used questionable punctuation, since he put in an apostrophe before the “s” in Orioles.

55 Bowman Coleman

The classic ’55 “Color TV” card of Joe Coleman leaves no doubt as to who the first player is to wear Orioles togs on a Bowman card.  Joe’s first year with the Orioles was ‘54 and he is clearly clad in ’54 Orioles garb.

Let me know if you have evidence that disputes my findings. I will not be driven to Homicide: Life on the Street” if proven wrong.

I know most of you would like to hang me on the “wire” for continuing this series. But, after walking the streets of Baltimore, I’m goin’ to Kansas City.  Kansas City here I come!

 

Lusting in My Heart for Tommy Smith

The Summer of 1976 saw Mark Fidrych seemingly come out of nowhere to be a rookie sensation.  His surprising success was mirrored in politics when an obscure, peanut farming governor ascended to the highest office in the land.  President Jimmy Carter will occupy the Oval Office for approximately two months before the Seattle Mariners and Toronto Blue Jays take the field for the first time in April of ‘77.

Starting in ’74, Topps began distributing all the cards in their base set at once (they did this in select markets in 1973), meaning there was no longer an opportunity to take photos in spring training and include them in later series.  Therefore, all the Blue Jays and Mariners cards feature poorly rendered, airbrushed cap insignia.

77 Smith

As a kid growing up in Washington State, it would be an understatement to say I was “stoked” at the prospect of Major League Baseball returning to Seattle.  I certainly “lusted in my heart” at the prospect of collecting Mariners cards.  I began purchasing-by mail-complete sets in ’74.  Once my ’77 set arrived, I discovered that the first ever Mariner card was that of Tommy Smith.  Who!?

Tommy was a little used outfielder made available by the Indians in the expansion draft.  The Mariners waited until the 58th pick to add him to the roster. Smith didn’t make the squad out of spring training but found his way to Seattle later in the season.  After 21 games with the M’s, Tommy’s career in organized baseball ended.

The first Blue Jay on a card was veteran Steve Hargan.  Before an elbow injury in ’68, Steve appeared to be destined for greatness with Cleveland.  An All-Star year in ’67 led to his inclusion in the ’68 Topps game insert subset.  He’s easily the most obscure player in the set and was selected by Topps over teammates Sam McDowell and Luis Tiant.   Picked in the 39th round of the expansion draft from Texas, Steve was the oldest pitcher on the Blue Jays roster.  He was a Jay for only a short time before being dealt back to the Rangers on 5/9/77.

Whether coincidence or not, Topps featured the two winningest pitchers for the Blue Jays and Mariners during the ’77 season as the first to debut their teams uniforms in the next year’s set.  The “Tall Arkansan,” Glenn Abbott, won 13 games in the inaugural season for Seattle.  He went on to be the M’s best starter in the early years.  His fellow 13 game winner, Dave Lemanczyk, is the Blue Jays first card.  Like Abbott, he will be a mainstay in Blue Jay rotation during the lean, expansion years.

By the way, the ’77 set contains an error card for Mariner Dave Collins.  He was first batter in Mariners history, leading off as the DH against Frank Tanana and the Angels.  Of course, Dave struck out–thus launching me on a 40-year (ED: so far) “trail of tears” as a long-suffering Mariners fan.  The photo on Dave’s card is that of his ’76 Angels teammate, Bob Jones.  The O-Pee-Chee set has a correct photo (right, above) of Collins.

 

Bill Beer

Although you may need a six-pack of “Billy Beer” to wash away the memory of this post, I shall forge ahead with a look at the ’93 and ’97 expansion teams in a future post.  Neither “killer” rabbits, vengeful Ayatollahs or a “malaise” can stop my quest.

 

 

 

The Cards That Made Milwaukee Famous

On January 20, 1953, General Dwight D. Eisenhower became President of the United States. “Ike” and the First Lady, Mamie, scarcely had time to settle into the White House before the Milwaukee Braves debuted on April 13.

The “Brew City” offered a new, publicly funded stadium (County) located out of the downtown area with acres of parking. Since the Braves would always play “second fiddle” in popularity to the Red Sox in Boston and with financial losses mounting, owner Lou Perini pulled up stakes and headed for the upper Midwest.

However, the final approval to shift the franchise wasn’t given until March 18, 1953. Topps and Bowman had already produced Boston Braves cards. The two companies will have to add Milwaukee cards, but they take different tacks.

53 Topps Crowe

The first eight Braves in the Topps set are painted (like all 1953 Topps) Boston cards and are from “series” 1 and 2. The ’53 set was released in “waves” but not formal series with checklists. George Crowe is the initial Braves card numerically. Interestingly, he is shown with the Yankee Stadium “frieze” in the background, despite never having played in the American League. Spahn, Matthews and Sisti are amongst the others wearing the Boston “B” on their caps.

53 Topps Crandall

Del Crandall is the first Brave to represent Milwaukee — on card #179 in “series” 3. A plain block “M” has been painted on his cap to signify the new city. The six other Milwaukee cards also have the fake “M” insignias. As best as I can determine, there are no cards showing Braves wearing an authentic Milwaukee cap in ‘53.

53 Bowman Grimm Front53 Bowman Grimm Back

Topps’ rival, Bowman, produced a groundbreaking set utilizing color photography for the first time by a major company in ‘53. All the Braves in the set have Boston caps or with the insignia not visible. Perhaps Bowman didn’t want to mare this beautiful set with excessive airbrushing. There are three Braves depicted as being on Boston, with Sam Jethroe being the first coming in at card # 3. Manager “Jolly Cholly” Grimm is the first Milwaukee card at #69. Since this set has no lettering on the front, the back has the only indication of the franchise shift.

53 BW Bowman Cooper

A set of cards with black and white photos was produced by Bowman as well. Bowman may have intended this set as a third series of color cards but decided to save money by not printing it in color. But, the cards are not a direct continuation of the color set, since they are numbered 1-64. All the Braves cards have Milwaukee on the backs, which lends additional credence to the idea that this set was printed last, with the intent to use it as a final series. As with the color cards, the Braves either have a Boston “B” on the caps or the insignia isn’t visible.

54 Topps Crandall   53 Crandall Spick and Span

Since Topps still used colorized photos in ’54, it is difficult to know definitively if the first Milwaukee Brave in the set, Del Crandall, is wearing a real Milwaukee “M.” I speculate that it is authentic, since the “M” font is correct and there were many photos taken of Del in ’53. (The accompanying photo used for the “Spic and Span” set is an example.) The next six Braves cards could possibly be airbrushed, but the speculation stops with card #128: Hank Aaron.

54 Topps Aaron   MJ Aaron Photo

As many of you know, one of the leading authorities on sports images is one of our most well-known committee members: Keith Olbermann. In an exchange of emails, he sent images of Aaron from a March 18, 1953 photo session for the Milwaukee Journal newspaper. The position of the cap and exposed forehead clearly indicates that the Topps card image is from this photo session. Furthermore, I found another image on the Wisconsin Historical Society website that was taken seconds before or after the card picture.

I learned from Olbermann that — to the best of his knowledge — Topps didn’t take their own photos until at least ’56. Instead, they relied on team or press produced shots. This explains how the Milwaukee Journal photo ended up on their 1954 card.

54 Topps Jay

Additionally, Olbermann pointed out that Joey Jay and Mel Roach signed with the Braves in ’53. Their card photos are undoubtedly from ’53 as well.

Logan Bowman 54   54 Wilson Bowman

Bowman doesn’t use the same vivid, color printing process in ’54 as ‘53, resulting in washed-out images. Thus, the “M” on the caps is not crystal clear. However, I believe that card #16, Jim Wilson, was taken during the ’53 season — since several of the Braves cards use photos taken at the Polo Grounds with similar poses and lighting. Johnny “Yatcha” Logan (#80) is definitely from ’53, due to the photo being taken at County Stadium in Milwaukee.

The Eisenhower era of the ‘50s was a “brave” new world in many respects, including the shifting of long established franchises to new cities. The Browns, Athletics, Dodgers and Giants all followed the Braves gambit. The nation liked “Ike” (not Delock), and I would like you to prepare for the next installment in my quest to pin down the first card for each transplanted team.

Please let me know if you have evidence that disproves any of my speculations. The cards that made Milwaukee famous may have made a fool out of me.