Fleer Funnies

Like many of you, any card series that dealt with sports sparked my interest as a kid. Fleer offered several collecting options beyond traditional picture cards. I collected the cloth logo and cap emblem stickers, “Famous Feats” in ’72 and “Wildest Days” in ‘73 as well as the ’70 and ’71 World Series.

The World Series sets featured cartoons or caricatures of baseball players and managers. The cartoons do a nice job of conveying the prime event or factor that led to outcome of that particular year. Robert Laughlin was the cartoonist who came up with this concept. He self-produced a set in the late ‘60s and then sold the concept to Fleer.

WS32 (70)
1970 Fleer

 

WS 32 (71)
1971 Fleer

The two sets are not duplicates. 1970 consists of 66 standard sizes cards with a narrative of the series printed in blue on the back. In ’71, Fleer produced 68 cards (issuing a card for the 1904 series that was not played, and adding 1970), and uses a completely new cartoon and the MLB logo to the front. Also the backs are different with scores for each game and a different narrative printed in black.

Since I’ve completed the ’70 set recently, it will be the focus of the post.

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The “Miracle Braves” rocketing to an incredible upset of the “Mackmen” is a good example of a generic cartoon players telling the series story. Also it demonstrates that one of Laughlin’s aims was “kid appeal.”

WS 09

One of my favorites is the ’09 card which has great caricatures of a maniacal Ty Cobb and a dignified Honus Wagner. Notice the nick-names on the crossed bats.

WS 19

The “Black Sox” card is an excellent example of Laughlin capturing the essence of a particular series.

WS 48

Native-American themed logos should be consigned to the “dust bin” of history, but as an eight year old I loved this ’48 Series card.

WS 60

This ’60 World Series depiction nicely sums up the underdog aspect of the Pirates’ win.

WS 69 Front

The “Cinderella” Mets ride in style at the expense of the Orioles on this ’69.

WS 69 Back 

The lack of specific players’ names within the narrative on the back is the result of Fleer not securing the rights from the MLB Players’ Association.   All mention of active players was omitted from the narratives.

 

To find out more details, check out this “Sports Collectors Digest” article.

 

The Wild, Wild West

The ‘70s and early ‘80s saw a sartorial explosion of color in Major League Baseball. The Astros “Tequila Sunrise” jersey and the Padres various brown, yellow and orange togs are the gaudiest examples. This movement from home whites and road grays was not exclusive to the “bigs;” the minor leagues saw a similar profusion of color.

In addition to decades’ worth of Mariners farm team cards, I have accumulated many other minor league sets. Recently while browsing through a binder of late ‘70s and early ’80 Pacific Coast League cards, I was assaulted with some true “retina burners.” Here’s a look at some seriously questionable uniform designs.

Sexton Toros

This ’80 TCMA Tucson Toros card show the most egregious example of “double-knit” debauchery. Obviously, the Toros were inspired by the Astros but went too far. The desert earth tones, diagonal lettering and orange base add up to a real mess. The caps only make the outfit worse. Supposedly, the colors would “run” when laundered, making for an even more psychedelic effect.

Pietroburgo Tigers  Alston Tacoma

Not to be out done by Tucson, the Tacoma Tigers created a “dog’s breakfast” design as well. These ’80 TcMA cards show two hideous combinations. I know all too well that eight months of gloomy, Pacific Northwest weather can do strange things to the mind, but what were they thinking?!

Harris Vancouver

Tacoma’s Canadian brethren to the north got into the uniform perversion act as well. The Vancouver Canadians sported these mono-chrome Navy “jobs” in this ‘80 TCMA.

Beavers  81 Beavers

The other Northwest entry, Portland, went nuts as well. These ’81 Beavers cards show the mix-and-match style popularized by the Pirates. In ’81, Luis Tiant signed with the Pirates but spent most of the year at AAA Portland where he tossed a no hitter.

Rocky-Bridges 82   Jones Giants

Phoenix Giants donned this forgettable ensemble in ’82. Not even the signature “chaw” in his cheek could make Rocky Bridges look anything else but ridiculous in these “babies.” The “pill box” caps are the perfect accessory to this abomination. This ’81 Tommy Jones shows the uniform in its full glory.

80 Ogden

The ’80 Ogden, Utah A’s had fairly staid uniforms, but what’s up with the cap? It would be more appropriate on the head of a trucker. The yellow undershirt from the parent club worn by Milt Ramirez doesn’t quite match the overall color scheme. Like many of the TCMA cards of this era, this photo was taken at Tacoma’s Cheney Stadium.

Allen Lynn

Lastly, I switch to the Eastern League to present this ’80 TCMA Lynn Sailors card of future Mariner Jamie Allen. The uniform manufacturer somehow sold the same awful design worn by Tacoma to the Sailors management as well.

 

Popcorn Refill

My previous post on Seattle Rainiers and Angels popcorn cards from the ‘50s and ‘60s omitted a unique promotion that allowed kids to trade the popcorn cards for photos. Much to the chagrin of modern collectors, this exchange unintentionally created a scarcity of high grade cards from certain years.

AD

From ’56-’58 a local drive-in chain (Gil’s) and grocery store (Ralph’s Thriftway) sponsored the card exchange promotion. The merchants gave away an 8X10 glossy photo–identical to the card or a full version of the cropped card shot–in exchanged for nine popcorn cards. The accompanying ad from a 1956 Rainiers program whetted kids’ appetites for popcorn and the card swap. Former major league star Vern Stephens is featured in the ad.

Balcena card
Popcorn card

 

Balcena 8x10
8×10 photo
glynn
Popcorn card

 

57Popcorn8x10Glynn
8×10 photo

These Bobby Balcena and Bill Glynn cards and photos are examples of the exchange. By the way, Balcena was the first Filipino-American to play in MLB. He had a “cup of coffee” with the Reds in ’56. Glynn played for the Phillies and Indians in the late ‘40s and early ‘50s.

SmithLombardi

Employees at Ralph’s and Gil’s would stamp, punch or mark the cards before returning them to the kids in order to prevent them from presenting the same cards to get additional photos.   The Vic Lombardi card shows both a stamp and mark. Note the ad promoting the card/photo exchange on the backs. Lombardi was in the starting rotation of Brooklyn Dodgers in the late ‘40s. He started and lost game two of the ’47 World Series. The Milt Smith card shows a hole punched by a “soda jerk” at Gil’s. Milt had a brief stint with the Reds in ’55.

58PopcornBasinski

I will conclude this “corny” narrative with a player whose off season job was atypical for a “jock.” Eddie “Fiddler” Basinski was Brooklyn’s starting shortstop during the war year of 1945. With the return of the regulars from the war effort, Eddie took up residence with the Portland Beavers of the PCL for 11 seasons. He played for the Rainiers in ’57 and ’58. After the season, Eddie returned home to Buffalo where he was a violinist in the Buffalo Symphony.

Popcorn Cards

 

Fans who attended Pacific Coast League games between 1954 and 1968 at Seattle’s Sicks’ Stadium had the opportunity to collect cards featuring Rainiers and Angels players, managers and coaches. These 2”X 3” glossy, black-and-white cards were imbedded in boxes of popcorn, protected by a translucent sleeve of waxed paper.

wills 2

341 cards were produced over the entire 15 year run. 1959 saw the most cards produced (37), ’63 the least (15) with most years in the high teens or low twenties. Depending on the year, the card backs were either blank or had an advertisement. Almost every set has variations which include: misspelled names, wrong positions, blank backs instead of ads and cards with different pictures of the same player. The most prominent error card is the ’57 Maury Wills, which refers to him as “Morrie.” No collector is known to possess all the cards, although some are close.

Hutch 2

Few would argue that Seattle’s most beloved ball player is Fred Hutchinson. He was a schoolboy sensation who moved across the street from Franklin High School to Sicks’ Stadium after graduation. Fred won 25 games for the 1938 Rainiers with victory 19 coming on his 19th birthday. “Hutch” returned to manage the Rainiers in ’55 and ’59 resulting in two cards.

57PopcornODoulLemon 1

Besides “Hutch” several other former major league players served as manager. Lefty O’Doul ‘57 and Bob Lemon ‘66 are two well know examples. Connie Ryan, Johnny Pesky, Mel Parnell, Chuck Tanner and Joe Adcock all had stints as Seattle’s skipper.

Artie Wilson

Artie Wilson, who had a brief career with the New York Giants, integrated the Rainiers-along with Bob Boyd-in ’52.

58PopcornPinsonpetrocelli r

Vada Pinson ‘57, and Rico Petrocelli ‘64 are two of many Rainiers and Angels who went on to have long major league careers. Vern Stephens, Larry Jansen, Claude Osteen, Andy Messersmith and Jay Johnstone are additional examples of players whose likenesses could be found amongst the kernels.

Pattin Angels

Marty Pattin ‘66 is one of five Angels who became Pilots when Seattle went “big league” in ‘69. 

58 Orteig

Ray Orteig is representative of the many career minor league players with cards. The stalwart catcher had four cards over the years. He owned a night club and tavern near my home town.

grilli

Next time you dig into a box of popcorn at the ballpark, check closely. Guido Grilli may be lurking under the kernels.

 

The Champs Celebrate

From 1960 to 1977–with the exceptions of 1966 and 1976–Topps included in their set World Series cards that highlighted each of the previous year’s games. Collectors could acquire four, five, six or seven cards depending on the length of the “Fall Classic.” The front usually featured the star of the game, a brief headline and the box score on the back. For example, these are from 1968 (showing games from the 1967 Series).

68 Yaz

68 brock

 

Additionally, an extra card was included that provided the total series stats on back and a celebration photo on the front. The celebrants were either in the euphoric clubhouse or cavorting on the field. The cards didn’t always favor star players since coaches, managers and benchwarmers all show up. This practice lasted until ’77 with exception of ’66. Also celebration cards for the first three years of the League Championship Series were produced. Let’s take a look at the celebrating champs.

 

60 Dodgers

The Dodgers are the happy champs in this ’60 card. In only their second year in LA, the Dodgers took down the White Sox in six games in ‘59. The man getting soaked with “suds” in the Comiskey Park clubhouse is pitching coach Joe Becker.

 

61 Pirates

The architect of the most famous “walk-off” homer in history, Bill Mazeroski, is fittingly featured on the 1961 card. Teammate Gino Cimoli clowns around with a fedora.

 

62 Yankees

This happy trio is all smiles after clinching the ’61 championship in five games. On the left is Johnny Blanchard who started in right field in game five and went three for four. Journeyman Bud Daley (middle) replaced Ralph Terry in the 3rd inning and went the rest of the way for the victory. Elston Howard rounds out the group in this ‘62 card. Notice the skylight in the Crosley Field clubhouse.

 

63 yankees

Series MVP Ralph Terry and Hall-of-Fame great Whitey Ford “whoop it up” in this ‘63 card after defeating the Giants in a close seven game series in ’62.

 

64 Dodgers

The ’64 celebration card moves from clubhouse to the field as the ’63 champion Dodgers mob Sandy Koufax after the four game “sweep “of the Yankees. Number 24 is manager Walt Alston, 23 is Bart Shirley, 7 belongs to Lee Walls and 33 is pitching coach Joe Becker.

1965-Topps-139-World-Series-The-Cards-Celebrate-NM-MT-8-22754123

64 red cap

 

Cardinals Tim McCarver and Bob Gibson embrace as others pile on after the last out in game seven of the ’64 series in this ’65 card. Incidentally, this card along with the previous celebration photos were colorized black and white photos. The artist who did the colorization painted the Cardinals caps blue instead of red. ’64 was the year St. Louis starting wearing red caps at home. The accompanying photo and this video show the red “lids” and this article explains it all.

 

 

Topps didn’t include World Series cards in the ’66 set.

 

67 WS (2)

After sweeping the Dodgers in four games to win the ’66 title, game four winner Dave McNally and manager Hank Bauer embrace. Bauer appears to have been the recipient of a “shaving cream pie” to the face. As you can see, Topps switches to black-and-white photos for the World Series cards in ’67. The “TV screen” format reminds me of a black and white portable I had in my room as a kid.

 

68 WS

In ’68, the Cardinals celebrate after waking up the “Impossible Dream” Red Sox by winning the ’67 series in seven games. ’67 NL MVP Orlando Cepeda is doused with Champaign by an unknown player as Tim McCarver (far left), future Seattle Pilots manager Joe Schultz (back) and Nelson Briles join in the fun. The player in foreground appears to be Joe Horner with Dal Maxvill beside him. Joe Schultz undoubtedly “pounded the old Budweiser” at some point during the celebration.

 

69 WS

Another black-and-white photo graces the ’69 card with the victorious ‘68 Tigers ecstatic after eking out a seven game win versus St. Louis. 31 game winner, Denny McClain (center), joins the hat-wearing Dick McAuliffe and slugger Willie Horton in jubilation.

 

70 NLCS

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1969 marked the beginning of divisional play which necessitated League Championship Series. In ’70, Topps created cards for each game and included pennant-clinching celebration cards. The “Miracle Mets” are number one in the NL as Ken Boswell, Tommy Agee, Nolen Ryan and Wayne Garrett attest.   Frank Robinson, Paul Blair, Andy Etchebarren and Davey Johnson celebrate winning the AL flag for the Orioles.

 

1970-WS-Mets

The Mets pull off an incredible upset in the World Series, winning in five games. Ed Kranepool, Tug McGraw, Ed Charles and Ken Boswell celebrate “one for the record book.” Bud Harrelson is in the back with the unbuttoned jersey

 

71 NLCS

1971AL-Playoffs

Topps goes with a “sepia tone” look for the 1971 playoff cards. Lee May, Woody Woodward and Angel Bravo congratulate Bobby Tolan for helping defeat the Pirates. Davey Johnson and Andy Etchebarren show up again along with Curt Motton, coaches Billy Hunter and George Bamburger and Boog Powell in the AL card as the Orioles record their second straight sweep of the Twins.

 

71 WS

The ‘71World Series card is in full-color with Andy Etchebarren, Merv Rettenmund, Mike Cuellar, and Boog Powell celebrating after wrapping up the Series in five games in ‘70. Not sure of the player in the right foreground, though it could be Tom Shopay.

 

1972-topps-al-playoffs-brooks-robinson-belanger

72 nlcs

The Pirates and Orioles pennants in ’71 are commemorated in ’72 with Brooks Robinson shaking hands with Mark Belanger and Jackie Hernandez making a catch in front of Willie Stargell.

 

72 WS

The buoyant Bucs celebrate a series win with Manny Sanguillen hugging manager Danny Murtaugh, Steve Blass is next, Jose Pagan is on the right in front and # 44, Coach Frank Oceak, rushes to the pile.

 

Topps went with one playoff card for each league in ’73 and ‘74 depicting action shots but not a true celebration. In ’75 one card featuring both LCS’s is produced. Our remaining cards are for the World Series.

 

73 WS.A's

The A’s win the first of three titles in ’72. The traditional pile on pitcher and catcher photo is used in the ’73 version as Rollie Fingers, catcher Dave Duncan and an obscured Sal Bando are pounced on by Ken Holtzman and a leaping Ted Kubiak in the back. The Red walking in the background is third base coach Alex Grammas. Number 41 is A’s Coach Jerry Adair.

 

74 WS

The A’s win again in ’73 producing a ’74 celebration card showing Sal Bando and Ray Fosse embracing Darold Knowles after the final out of game seven against the improbable National League champion Mets.

 

75 WS

In this ’75 Rollie Fingers is congratulated for beating the Dodgers in five games in ’74 by Reggie Jackson and pitching coach, Wes Stock, in the white coach’s cap. The numberless bat boy might be Stanley Burrell, who will become famous as the pioneering “hip hop” artist, MC Hammer.

Hammer

Burrell worked in various capacities with the A’s from ’73-’80. “Hammer’s” primary role was providing play-by-play over the phone for Charlie Finley when he was out of town. Also, he spied on the players and reported their antics to Charlie. Reggie Jackson nicknamed Stanley “Hammer” due to his resemblance to Henry Aaron.

 

76 WS

In ’76 Topps departs from the practice of issuing a card for each game, producing only one card. The center picture is of the Reds celebrating their win over Boston in a classic series. Tony Perez hugs closer Will McEnaney and a hidden Johnny Bench. Joe Morgan is on the right and I believe Terry Crowley is the player coming up in the rear.  I am unsure of the other jubilant guy.

 

77 WS

Topps is back to producing a separate celebration card in ’77 with Will McEnaney “reaching for the sky” after recording the final out of the ’76 series sweep against the Yankees. First baseman, Tony Perez, is the other player.

If you know of more contemporary celebration cards or versions from manufacturers other than Topps, please leave a comment here or on Twitter.

Butch Wax

 

Mid-twentieth century men wore their hair short with some type of hair dressing. A tube of Brylcreem or a bottle of Vitalis could be found in medicine cabinets all over America. Those who wanted a real “clean” look opted for the crew, butch or flattop cuts. These extra-short styles often required a thick pomade–oddly pinkish in color–known as “Butch Wax” to make the short hair in front stand up. I know this first hand due to childhood trauma resulting from forced crew and flattop cuts in an era of increasingly longer hair styles.

The well chronicled emergence of the counter-culture in the late 1960s sparked a revolution in personal appearance with men sporting long, undressed hair, beards and mustaches. This movement toward the “Age of Aquarius” didn’t sit well with my parents and it certainly didn’t jive with the hidebound traditions of baseball.

Players were expected to be clean shaven with short-cropped hair. 1970 baseball cards started to show players with lengthening sideburns which served as a harbinger of the “hairy” poses we are familiar with as the ‘70s progressed. However even after the zeitgeist overtook baseball in the ‘70s–starting with the hirsute “-Swingin’ Oakland A’s–some teams, like the Cincinnati Reds, remained adamant when it came to “old school” grooming. A vestige of this school of thought still remains with the Yankees prohibition of facial hair.

But the “far out” and “groovy” new looks on display during the ’67 “summer of love” in San Francisco or at “Woodstock” in ’69 were nowhere to be seen in baseball card photos at this time. It was still “squaresville” as far as Topps was concerned. The players’ boycott of Topps in ’68, expansion in ’69 and many trades led to the use of older photos and many bare-headed shots. As a result, decidedly “un-cool” hair styles would greet the “tie-dyed” clad kid when he laid down some “bread” for a “stash” of wax packs.

Here’s a look at some “squares” you can really “dig.”

This ’68 Pete Richert shows off a great flattop. It appears that Pete was wearing cap before the photo was taken which resulted in a slightly “mussed” look. There had to be some Butch Wax in use since the hair still stands up in front. Pete would be a valuable lefty out of the Orioles bullpen during their ’69-’71 run as AL and World Series (’70) champs.

“Fat Jack” Fisher shares a similarly disheveled flattop look in his ’68 photo. The “level headed” look came in handy for Jack, since he could find barbers in all the cities he ventured to in his journeymen career who could “top him off and wax him up.” He served up Ted Williams’ final home run in ’60 and Roger Maris’ 60th homer in ’61.

Eddie Fisher’s ’68 card bares a striking resemblance to my high school baseball coach who we knick-named “Bristle Bob.” Eddie floated his “knuckler” for 15 seasons.

Another well-traveled hurler with Butch Wax in his locker was Stan Williams. The ’68 and ’69 cards show the freshly barbered hurler in all his “buzz cut” glory.

Perhaps this classic flattop in ‘68 kept Tony LaRussa’s head cool, allowing his brain to absorb all the nuisances of baseball in preparation for his Hall-of-Fame managerial career.

This ’68 Astros had a pair of “close cropped” relievers in Fred Gladding and Dave Giusti. Fred pieced together a decent career with Houston and Detroit. Giusti would go on to be a “palm ball” tossing bullpen ace for the Pirates.

In this ’67 Danny Cater shows off an impressive flattop. He was second in the AL in batting in ’68-“The Year of the Pitcher”- hitting .290 behind Yaz’s .301.

Hall-of-Famer to be Jim Bunning shows his adherence to the conservative baseball culture with this flattop in ’69, foreshadowing the conservative positions he would espouse as a two-term US Senator from Kentucky.

This ’70 card shows Jim Bouton’s foil in Ball Four, Fred Talbot, with his signature “waxed up” flattop. The conservative southerner took exception to the “mod perm” style worn by Pilots catcher Merritt Ranew in a memorable exchange in Ball Four.

Lou Piniella styles this “sweet,” “bristle cut” on a ’70 Topps Super.

“Tough-as-nails,” ex-Marine Hank Bauer has a “military ready” cut in this “sweaty” ’69 manager card.

Although he grew some sideburn during his time with the short-lived Pilots, Wayne Comer’s ’69 card still has a nice “burr” cut from his days as Senators property.

Phil Roof displays a really “high and tight roof” in this ’70 card. Alas, Phil would take his well-barbered noggin to Milwaukee.

The Yankees only got Charlie Smith and his “crew cut” in exchange for Roger Maris.

1969 World Series hero Al Weis is as “square” as it gets in this ’68 card.

Chuck Cottier’s look in ’69 would have made “Sergeant Carter” proud.

It’s time to stop “waxing nostalgic” and cut this “follicle farce” short. But no late ‘60s “short hair styles in sports” retrospective could be complete without showing the quintessential “flat-topped” athlete: Johnny U.!

More bunting, please

“Boys, bunting is like ******* ***. Once you learn how, you never forget.” Joe Schultz from Ball Four (Since this is a “PG” forum, you can look up the missing words.)

85 butler

All too frequently baseball broadcasters will comment on “modern” players’ inability to bunt. Supposedly, every player used to spend hours “catching” the ball with the bat and placing perfect bunts at will. The exact time players stopped trying to perfect their bunting technique is never articulated; however, it had to be after Brett Butler retired since his name is synonymous with the art of bunting.

Of course much has been written about the lack of correlation between bunting and run production. Earl Weaver, the Orioles Hall-of-Fame manager, recognized the folly of excessive bunting prior to advanced metrics and famously eschewed the bunt in favor of the three-run homer. Dan Levitt presents a good case against frequent bunting in this analysis: http://baseballanalysts.com/archives/2006/07/empirical_analy_1.php

No matter what side you come down on in the bunt debate, it is true that teams did bunt more frequently in the past. All this bunting “back in the day” is reflected in the numerous “bunting cards” found in the ‘60s and ’70s. The bunter pose was usually reserved for light hitting, middle infielders with slight builds or Whippet like outfielders. These frail but speedy types could “lay down” a sacrifice bunt or “drag” one for a single in their sleep. They constantly put the opposition on guard for a “safety” or “suicide squeeze.” Occasionally, a slugger would strike the pose as well. Now, let’s look toward the third base coach, get the “sign” and “roll one down” memory lane.

68 Oyler

The weak hitting “poster child” for the bunting pose has to be Ray Oyler. His inability to hit Major League pitching is legendary; best exemplified by his benching in the ’68 World Series to get Kaline’s bat in the lineup. His lifetime average of .175 and a .258 OBP confirms his “weak wand.” Ray peaked with 15 sacrifice bunts in ‘67. My unhealthy obsession with the Seattle Pilots compels me to mention that Ray was the opening day shortstop in ’69.

70 Blair

Being a big Orioles fan in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s explains why the ’70 Paul Blair is my favorite bunter pose card. The Gold Glove centerfielder hit second and frequently used his speed to get on base which allowed the Robinson boys and Boog Powell to “knock him in.” He led the AL in sacrifice bunts in ‘69 and had a career best 17 in ’75.

68 Ruiz71 Ruiz

Giraldo “Chico” Ruiz assumed the bunting stance in both ’68 and ’71. He was a speedy utility infielder who posted 12 sacrifice bunts in ’64 with the Reds. Ruiz is remembered for an infamous incident where he allegedly pulled a gun on Alex Johnson in the Angels clubhouse in 1971.

68 Cardenas

Ruiz’s ’68 teammate, Leo “Chico” Cardenas, had an almost identical photo. The slick-fielding shortstop “moved them over” 95 times in his career.

70 Hermosa

This ’70 Angel “Remy” Hermosa shows him attempting drag bunt. Angel recorded six sacrifice bunts in 91 career games.

72 Boots

Another early Expo shown “squaring around” is Charles “Boots” Day in ’72. Boots’ stats were less than exemplary, but he has to be enshrined in the “Best nick-name Hall-of-Fame.” Since he was primarily a catcher, the bunt pose is unusual but not unprecedented.

69 Satriano

Tom Satriano’s cards in ’67 and ’69 feature the same bunt stance photo. Like Boots, Satriano did occasionally play in the field. He had 14 career sacrifice bunts.

72 Jackie Henzo 76

Shortstops Jackie and Enzo Hernandez very much fit the prototypical bunter stereotype. Here we have Jackie in ’72 and Enzo in ’76. Those of you who attended the Miami SABR Convention in 2016 had the privilege of hearing Jackie reminisce as part of the Cuban player panel.

70 patek

When the Royals dealt Jackie to Pittsburgh in 1970, they received “Little” Freddy Patek. The diminutive shortstop was the perfect player for a bunt shot. His career successful sacrifice rate was 75%.

67 Johnson

Although he would later “muscle up” and slug 43 homers for the Braves in ’73, Davey Johnson modeled his bunting technique in this ’67.

66 Campy72 Campy76-Campyjackson 7071 JacksonJackson 74

Some guys were so associated with the bunt that they were depicted multiple times in the stance. Bert Campaneris shows up three times (’66, ’72, 76). Also Sonny Jackson put down a “bunt triple” in 70, 71 and 74.

68 Fregosi69 Fregosi

Although he had some power and good RBI production, Topps put Jim Fregosi in the pose in ’68 and repeated the picture in ’69. The player boycott of Topps undoubtedly explains the usage of the same photo, but maybe Topps just liked that cool turtle neck undershirt. Jim led the AL in sacrifice bunts in ’65.

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Being the complete player that he was, Joe Morgan undoubtedly mastered the art of bunting. He doesn’t fit the profile of the light hitter, but Topps had him pose bunting nonetheless in ’70.

71 Cardenal

 

Jose Cardenal must have kept a packed suitcase since he was constantly being traded. He is shown bunting in ’71 with the Cardinals.

I could “drag” this bunt theme on longer, but I will close with a few more examples.

72 Theobald69 Quilici70 oliver68 sutherland70 Leon74 rose

As action photos became the norm for cards, actual “in game” bunts show up regularly. This ’74 Pete Rose is a classic shot.

From the ‘90s to the present there are countless examples. As long as mangers continue to “flash the signs” and pitchers bat in the NL, the bunt shot will not be “sacrificed.”