Christie Brinkley’s 1996 Pinnacle set goes ‘beyond presumed sex appeal’

Christie Brinkley likely was taking selfies long before you. Way back in 1996.

Want proof? Take a look at the back of that year’s Pinnacle Series II baseball card set. In it are 16 limited, random insert cards – one per 23 packs – that feature playful pictures the supermodel-turned-photographer snapped of herself and select members of the Atlanta Braves and Cleveland Indians.

Serious and casual collectors alike may remember the initial popularity of the set and the news that Pinnacle had hired Brinkley. I was a semi-serious collector in those days, and up until a few years ago, I vaguely remembered the cards and the media buzz surrounding, first, the photo shoot, and second, the set’s release in late July of that year. (Sports Illustrated wasn’t so buzzed. More on that later.)

My memory of the card set was jolted about five years ago when a work colleague leaned back in his squeaky office chair and, from his cubicle across the narrow hallway, casually asked, “Hey, Chad. Have I ever shown you this picture of me with Christie Brinkley?”

The pop time for me to launch from my chair and dash to his office was all of 1.3689 seconds. I immediately fixed my eyes on his computer screen, where sure enough, beamed a photo of Christie Brinkley and my co-worker, mild-mannered, soft-spoken John Lucas, who in the 1990s, was the creative manager of design and photography at Pinnacle.

Christie Brinkley and John Lucas

In the photo, Brinkley is wearing white ringer top with thin, navy horizontal stripes and mirrored sunglasses. She, of course, looks flawless with her long blonde locks swept back from her face. Only few are out of place, but even those strays look perfectly placed.  If you look closely, you can barely see three of John’s fingers extending around Christie’s waist.

He must have thought he had died and gone to heaven. But, it was only Florida.

John is repping his company well in the shot, wearing a white Pinnacle T-shirt and brand-matching cap. He has Christie’s left arm on his right shoulder, and a smile that brilliantly and brightly encapsulates the moment.

John played it cool because “You had to play it cool,” he told me. “You couldn’t get star struck. You had to come across as a professional. She was very gracious and friendly, just a regular person who was very excited about the opportunity.”

As you can see in the photo, Brinkley and John are standing on an auxiliary field behind West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium. Excited to be there. The ballpark was then the spring training site of the Atlanta Braves. In the distance and over Brinkley’s right shoulder, are the bleachers of the crowded ballpark. The Indians and Braves, the previous season’s World Series combatants, were set to play an exhibition game that day. It was the first meeting since Atlanta took the Fall Classic from the Tribe five months earlier.

“I can’t believe I never showed you this,” John said as I stood in his cubicle peering at the photo on his Mac. I couldn’t believe it either. We had known each other for a year or more at that point and had talked a lot of baseball, but this episode in his life, inexplicably, never came up.

So, or course, I had a ton of questions, and John was happy to answer. I think we both were giddy to talk about baseball and a supermodel we both had eyes on since we were teenagers.

*****

The origin story behind the photo begins with John, whose job at Pinnacle was to guide the design and photography for card products, and his quest to “always be looking to break the repetitive tradition of baseball card photography,” he told me. “I was always striving to come up with photography concepts that would be different, edgy and well-received by our customers.”

Part of the issue with the same-ol’, same-ol’ card designs, at times, was with the players. They often were unreceptive to anything beyond basic concepts and poses. That conundrum came up in a conversation John had with the company’s photography director, Don Heiny, who told John about a time when a woman photographer had been assigned to a card photoshoot and garnered way more cooperation from the male players than had previous male photographers.

It was a valuable chunk of knowledge for John to store away in his memory, and it didn’t take long for the figurative flashbulb to spark about his head and rekindle the thoughtful guidance.

John was a fan of Brinkley, then 42, and he knew that she had an interest in photography from behind the camera.

“Wow,” he thought,” what if we send Christine Brinkley on assignment to spring training as a photographer for Pinnacle? The players would pose any way she asked.”

John took his idea up the ladder in the fall of 1994, sending a memo via fax – “this was pre-email days,” he reminded me – from his office in Connecticut to Pinnacle corporate headquarters in Grand Prairie, Texas.

In his memo to Michael Cleary, who was then Pinnacle’ chief operating officer and chief marketing officer, John relayed his conversation with Heiny about female photographers’ workability with male athletes, and he incorporated those thoughts in his pitch, writing:

“What experienced, female photographer is very well-known, has shot sports photography before (boxing) and is extremely beautiful? Christie Brinkley. Now I know it sounds crazy but think of all the P.R. we could get from this. The obvious stumbling block is first her acceptance and secondly the price. But we’ll never know unless we ask. Please call me with your thoughts. Thank you.”

John faxed the proposal, with the subject line: FUTURE DREAM TEAM SET, to Cleary on November 4, 1994 and then he waited.

And, waited.

“I never heard anything about it,” John recalled, until I asked someone there [in Texas] about it, and they said, ‘Are you kidding? That’s all everyone is talking about.’ I was really happy.”

That, I’m sure, is an understatement.

Nearly a year later, and after the usual back-and-forth negotiations with Brinkley and her representatives, John, his photography director, Heiny, and an assistant left their offices in chilly Connecticut for the warmth and excitement of spring training in West Palm Beach, Florida.

In the planning stage, they selected a group of players from the Braves and Indians as their subjects for this innovative, new card concept. “Both teams had really good and popular players, which made for strong collectable cards,” John told me as I, still astonished, stood in his office, hanging on every word. “At the time, these guys were baseball superstars, and their cards were collectables.”

The original plan had been to photograph six players from each team for a total of 12 cards in the set. However, for whatever reason – John does not recall – four other players were added for a total of 16 cards.

The players were, from the World Series champion Braves: Greg Maddux, Ryan Klesko, David Justice, Tom Glavine, Chipper Jones, Fred McGriff, Javier Lopez, Marquis Grissom, and Jason Schmidt. From the American League champion Cleveland Indians were Albert Belle, Manny Ramirez, Carlos Baerga, Sandy Alomar Jr., Jim Thome, Julio Franco and Kenny Lofton.

Once Pinnacle photographers met Brinkley at the spring training site, the shoot ran relatively smoothly. That is often not the case because there are “so many variables,” John said, “when you’re dealing with professional athletes.”

But, John was right in the reasoning behind his idea. “I figured if Christie said, “Hey guys, do this, do that – beyond the normal poses – they would certainly be cooperative and do it. And, they did!”

Well, most everyone.

Teaser alert: Albert Belle was a bit of a challenge.

John and Brinkley separately brainstormed ideas for poses. Pinnacle gave its model-slash-photographer a bio sheet for each player. She read those and developed concepts. John knew baseball and knew oodles about each of the players. Many of the props used the card photos were his idea, and some came right off the top of his head.

Literally.

“That fedora Fred McGriff is wearing, that was mine,” said John, who also designed the art for the cards. “And, I took a drill and cut into the baseball,” to give the appearance of teeth marks on the leather. McGriff is holding the ball near his open mouth as if he had just taken a large bite into the leather. The concept for McGriff’s card, No. 6 of 16, was a play on his nickname the Crime Dog, after McGruff, the animated bloodhound who appeared in PSAs in those days and was known to “take a bite out of crime.”

“We did quirky little things to make it interesting,” John recalled.

Marquis Grissom and Kenny Lofton were two of the Major League’s top base stealers at the time, and Brinkley wanted to illustrate that fact on the card. For Lofton, who had stolen 54 bases the year before, she had the speedster pose holding a base in each hand as if he were literally stealing bases. Brinkley posed Grissom, also known for blazing the base paths, in a mock run with a radar gun pointed in his direction. When you look at the card, that’s John’s right hand holding the radar gun.

John was the mastermind behind Braves’ pitcher Tom Glavine’s card. Knowing that Glavine was “a big golfer” John said, as were many of his teammates, they posed him on a pitcher’s mound, in full baseball uniform, with a pitching wedge ready to strike a baseball. “It was almost like he was chipping out of a sand trap,” John said.

Speaking of chipping, or more precisely, Larry “Chipper” Jones in this case, Brinkley proposed the idea to pose the then young ballplayer with his Braves cap on backward, his blue jersey partially untucked and sleeves rolled-up, and thick eye black across his cheeks. He was blowing a bubble as big and round as Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium.

The next day, the Greeneville (South Carolina) News published a quote from Jones saying, “All right, I’ve got Christie Brinkley undressing me.”

In addition to the card, Brinkley’s photo of Jones made Beckett Baseball Card Monthly’s June 1996 cover with a big, bold yellow headline that read: “Uptown Boy.” An inset photo shows Christie brushing makeup on Chipper’s nose.

Jones wrote about the experience in his 1997 book “Chipper Jones: Ballplayer,” claiming he had always had a crush on the model – of course, he did; everyone did – and worried about catching grief from Braves’ skipper Bobby Cox, who as Jones wrote “was a stickler for how you wear your uniform… But hey, she did with me as she pleased. What am I going to say?”

Way to take one for the team, Chipper!

On the card’s back, under the words “Christie Brinkley Collection,” is a fashion-editor-style description of the photo concept. It reads:

“Struck by Chipper’s youth, Christie rumpled his shirt, smudged his eye black and stuck a wad of bubble gum in his mouth to get that “sandlot” look.”

Jones and most of the other players we’re willing to play along, just like John had imagined back in his Pinnacle office months earlier when he developed the concept. “Their jaws were on the ground, smiling like little puppy dogs and doing everything she asked,” he recalled.

But, Albert Belle wasn’t having it.

Surprised?

“Christie and I both had concepts for Albert, but he said no to all of them,” John said.

So, they scrambled to find an idea Belle would agree to. John remembered the game in Belle’s then then recent history when the slugger yelled toward the Boston Red Sox dugout and flexed his bicep to show where his home run power originated. “Everyone knew about this, and we wanted to show his jacked biceps,” John said.

Albert’s response to the idea?

“No! I don’t repeat myself,” he said to John and Brinkley.

“Wow, what do we do now,” John recalled her asking.

What do you do when the surly slugger repeatedly rejects your ideas?

Forget the biceps. Tug at the heartstrings.

Perhaps in a moment of tossing her arms in the air in frustration, Brinkley asked Belle if he would hold her 13-month-old son, Jack, on his lap. Belle agreed.

“Albert was very happy to sit there with Christie’s son on his lap,” John told me. “He even cracked a nice, big smile.”

Brinkley snapped a round of photos, and that moment became the card. When the set was released in July, Pinnacle showed off the set to reporters and photographers at New York’s All-Star Café. An Associated Press photo from the event ran in newspapers the next few days showing the supermodel holding an oversized replica of the card depicting Belle with Jack sitting on his lap, both wearing Cleveland caps.

It was a hit!

On the back of Belle’s card, No. 10 in the collection, is Brinkley’s hastily self-snapped photo. It shows Jack, reaching from Albert’s lap, for his Mom. Belle is in the middle of the two, still smiling.

All of the card backs have Brinkley selfies taken with the ballplayers, via a bulky film camera – not a phone, of course. Most are non-descript with Brinkley smiling brightly, snuggled up to, or with her arm around, the ballplayers. The back of Chipper’s card shows Brinkley blowing a bubble, just like her subject. Indians third baseman Jim Thome – known for punching the ball out of the park – is wearing boxing gloves on the front and back of his card.

David Justice’s card back shows the 5’9” Brinkley looking up to the 6’3” slugger who towers above her. On Jason Schmidt’s card, it appears it was he who took the selfie, not Brinkley. Carlos Baerga is shirtless in his photo with the supermodel. He has a red heart painted on his chest because “he was the heart of the Indians,” John recalled.

Everything during the two-day shoot seemed to be working. The players were into it. Brinkley was having a blast. John was enjoying his moment in the sun.

The downside, however, was it took hours before the group could examine the results.

Remember, this was 1996.

“The night in between the two days of shooting, my director of photography, the photographer’s assistant and I had to get in a rental car and drive down to Miami from West Palm Beach to an after-hours photo lab and have them process the film and the pictures,” John told me.

The trip was about an hour and half each way after an exhausting day of work.

“We went down there to process the film of the pictures so we could bring them back and show Christie what they looked like, to make sure she was happy with the results of her work.

She loved the pictures,” John said smiling. “She was very pleased.”

Pinnacle had to be pleased, too, because collectors loved the unique concept. Also, Business Week reported that Brinkley’s ability to persuade the players to pose without demanding fees – some of “which can run up to $10,000 apiece,” the publication wrote – saved Pinnacle a substantial amount of money.

Today, Beckett lists each cards’ value at .50, including the un-numbered card picturing Brinkley sitting on her knees on a beach, topless it appears, holding a book to her chest. But when the cards came out, they were uber popular with collectors. In their “Sports Collectors” column in the Aug. 4, 1996 edition of The Journal News (White Plains, New York), John Kryger and Tom Hartloff quoted individual card values they had received from “one dealer’s price list.”

Atlanta pitcher Greg Maddux’s card was valued the most then at $49.95. Behind him was Belle, Chipper Jones and Manny Ramirez at $39.95. The lowest values were $14.95 for Grissom, Schmidt and Julio Franco. As of this writing, you can find the individual cards online with prices usually ranging from .99 for Belle and Klesko to $49.99 for Jones.

But, John, who still has the full set, never has given a thought to the cards’ market value or what they are selling for on eBay. “I never looked at them in that way,” he said. “I’ve always looked at them as an example of quick thinking and my job and role with the company.”

*****

Once the cards were released in July 1996, tons of media coverage focused on their novelty and immediate popularity. There was plethora of coverage from newspapers – many ran AP photos and stories, magazines and even late-night TV even talked about the cards.

It was mostly favorable, and great publicity for Pinnacle, which is what John had planned for his company.

There was, however, one notable exception, even if it was tongue-in-cheek.

In its popular weekly feature, “This Week’s Sign That The Apocalypse is Upon Us,” Sports Illustrated wrote: “Pinnacle, a Texas-based trading-card company, has hired supermodel Christie Brinkley to photograph selected Atlanta Braves and Cleveland Indians for a soon-to-be-released set of baseball cards.”

SI picked the Brinkley photo shoot that particular week because, well, “Jeez, I don’t have a specific memory of it, Chad,” replied Jack McCullum in an email when I posed that question to him… 23 years after the fact. McCullum and fellow SI writer Richard O’Brien co-edited the section in those days. They “went through dozens and dozens of newspapers, magazines, press releases, etc. to find our weekly Apocalypse,” McCullum wrote.

More than two decades later, John laughed about SI’s witty assertion that his idea was sending civilization toward its doom.

“You can take it a couple of ways,” he said to me over the phone back home in Connecticut, months after our initial conversation. “You can take it like, ‘Wow, they’re really insulting my concept.’ But, you can look it as great publicity, and it was published everywhere, even in a global magazine like Sports Illustrated. Overall, that and the whole experience was pretty amazing.”

USA Today thought so, too. It gave the card concept its stamp of approval in its April 16, 1996 edition, writing “Thumbs-up: To a seemingly hokey idea that also is practical. Christie Brinkley will appear on some Pinnacle baseball cards coming in July. But she had a function beyond presumed sex appeal. In actually shooting the cards’ photos (including ones of herself), Brinkley got players to strike off-beat poses. Cleveland’s Albert Belle posed with Brinkley’s baby boy. Says Pinnacle’s Laurie Goldberg, “there wasn’t much chance of getting some of these guys with a regular photographer.”

Four more words needed to be added at the end of Goldberg’s quote to complete the sentiment:

Great idea, John Lucas.

Strike a Pose, There’s Nothing to It

I attended just one game at “old” Yankee Stadium, before the extensive remodel shut it down for two years. That game was on Sunday, June 7, 1970, notable because it was Bat Day. (The above photo is from that game, according to website from which I borrowed it.) I grew up two hours away, in Connecticut, and Bat Day was the major draw for a few busloads of local families that my father’s company organized. I was 9 years old, and what I most remember about the game (a 4-3 White Sox win in 12 innings) is the majesty of the Stadium (when compared with Fenway Park, the only other venue I had experienced), and the crowd: 65,880, the largest baseball gathering I will likely ever witness.

This all came to mind a few days ago when Lindy McDaniel passed away. McDaniel pitched for 21 years and was one of the great relief pitchers of his time, a time when relievers were deployed much differently than they are today. In my 1970 game, he pitched the final 5 innings, allowing just the single run in the 12th to lose. There were only four pitchers used in the game, in fact: Fritz Peterson (7 innings) and McDaniel (5) for the Yankees; Tommy John (9) and Wilbur Wood (3) for the White Sox.

I recall being struck by how hard McDaniel was throwing. Granted, this was my second live game, and the other three pitchers in the game were crafty southpaws. But I vividly recall the crack of Thurman Munson’s mitt, remarked upon by the children of Southeastern Connecticut.

Anyhow, after McDaniel’s death, my Twitter feed lit up (as per the depressing 2020 custom) with old baseball cards. One of the best McDaniel cards is from 1971 Topps.

I have owned this card for 49 years, but when I looked it over I was struck by the large crowd, coming at a time with the Yankees did not draw well. And it hit me: this *might* be the very game I attended. There is not much to go on–McDaniel pitched 28 games at Yankee Stadium, likely half during the day. The best evidence is the crowd–the Yankees averaged around 12,000 fans per game, and rarely saw a crowd like this down the left field line. So, it’s possible.

In 1971 Topps used photos from actual games for the first time (on their base player cards), a total of 52 photos taken at either Yankee Stadium or Shea Stadium. Why this had not occurred to me in 49 years I cannot say, but a couple of days ago I decided to check out the other Yankees and White Sox “action” cards to see if I could find possible matches for my game.

Of the nine Yankee action cards, four of them clearly show an opponent that is not the White Sox: Thurman Munson (A’s), Gene Michael (Angels), Curt Blefary (A’s), and Jake Gibbs (Indians). Three do not show an opponent: McDaniel, Danny Cater, and Fritz Peterson. And two clearly show the White Sox: Ron Woods and Roy White.

Woods turns out to be the key card in this story, because my June 7 game is the only time he batted against the White Sox during a 1970 day game. Unless this is from a prior year (highly unlikely), I witnessed this plate appearance. What’s more, our seats were on the first base side at ground level up behind the dugout–so this is roughly the angle I had. Bonus clue: someone in crowd (at the far right, just above the dugout) is holding up a bat.

The Roy White card is from the same game–though the angle is slightly different, if you look closely you can see some of the same people in the crowd behind the Chicago dugout. Duane Josephson is behind the mask in both photos.

So that’s two cards from my game. Let’s look at the two White Sox action cards from the 1971 set.

Tommy John pitched just one game in Yankee Stadium that season, so this becomes our third match. This looks to be the same angle as our McDaniel card above (which may or may not be from this game), though (based on the shadowing) perhaps from a couple of hours earlier.

McCraw played first base in three 1970 day games at Yankee Stadium, but the other two games had crowds of 10,000 and 9,000 people; the packed bleachers out in distant centerfield makes it almost certain this is the June 7 game. That makes four cards. (The baserunner looks to be Gene Michael–the Stick had two singles and walk in this game. This photo was likely taken after his ninth inning single; his earlier walk loaded the bases; and his later single was after McCraw had moved to right field.)

For completeness, I will show the two other Yankee action cards (other than McDaniel) that do not show an opponent.

Not much to go on here. The key is whether these crowds look like sell outs, which the blurry background kind of obscures.

I generally do not play the role of card sleuth, which others have done so well. (Example: Ten cards from the same game?) The early 1970s is ripe for this sort of investigation, since Topps did not crop very well in those early action days. This left a lot of clues on the card to help place the game, or even the play.

I find it very satisfactory to discover color photos from a game I attended 50 years ago, the only game I ever saw at the original House that Ruth Built, in a card set I have studied as much as any I have ever owned. (The next time I went to Yankee Stadium was post-remodel, a Tiger game in 1977. I suppose I need to study the 1978 Topps set next?)

As for Lindy McDaniel, who started off this post, I hope he rests in peace, and left the world knowing how much pleasure he gave kids like me all those years ago.

Back Story: 1971 Topps

Note: This is Part V of a series focusing primarily on the material featured on the backs of baseball cards (previous articles featured the 1956 Topps, 1960 Topps, 1954 Topps/Bowman and 1955 Topps-Bowman sets).

A popular set among collectors, the 1971 Topps baseball card set was truly innovative, offering something a little different on both the front and back sides of the cards. The fronts of the 752-card set—at the time, the biggest ever—featured a black-bordered motif, as exemplified by card No. 100, Pete Rose, and No. 600, Willie Mays.

This was a striking design. But for collectors interested in a card’s condition, the set offered two obvious challenges:

  • With a black, rather than a white, border, any imperfections on the edges showed up much more clearly than on a traditional white-bordered card
  • Unless the card was perfectly centered—and good luck finding perfectly-centered cards—there was usually either too much, or too little, of that slim black border on the left or right side of the card

But hey, this was 1971, and who ever thought people would be shelling out big bucks for baseball cards in mint (or near-mint) condition? Give Topps props for changing things up… and that was even more true of their design of the back side of the 1971 set. For the first time since 1962, Topps eschewed the by-now-standard year-by-year stat line for each player, instead providing the numbers for only the previous season, along with the player’s career totals. With more available room, Topps added a headshot of the player. These headshots came in several styles. Sometimes the shot had a little background; like clouds, trees or the stands of a stadium; No. 450, Bob Gibson, is a good example.

The backgrounds could be a little distracting; more effective were headshots with just the sky as a background. A good example is No. 501, Andy Etchebarren, whose “Wolf-man”-inspired eyebrows offer the viewer enough of a distraction.

And finally, some of the “head” shots were exactly that: just the head, ma’am. The results are, well, interesting. To me, the shots of New York mainstays Tommie Agee (No. 310) and Horace Clarke (No. 715), look like a pair of balloons from the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade.

Whatever their quality, the headshots on the backs of the 1971 cards let the collector know what the guy looked like… albeit via a small black-and-white shot of lower quality. Still, this gave Topps the freedom to do some experimenting on the card fronts. For the first time, the 1971 set replaced the standard posed shot on the front of many cards with a photo taken from major league game action. Way cool!

It was a nice innovation, and a number of these “player in action” shot are outstanding.
No. 118, Cookie Rojas, turning a double play, is a beauty. I also love the classic pitching motion of No. 520, Tommy John (better known in the Zminda household as “Johnny Tom”).

There are a number of excellent shots of players at bat. The afore-mentioned Andy Etchebarren swinging the bat is very nice, and No. 360, Jim Fregosi, is even better—a stunning action shot in horizontal format.

You can even do “Compare Batting Stances” with the horizontally-oriented cards of the Yankees’ Roy White (card No. 395) and Ron Woods (No. 514). The shots, pretty obviously taken from the same game, both include catcher Duane Josephson of the White Sox. (Pop quiz question: of this trio, who is the only one who does not yet have a SABR bio? Answer at the end of the article.)

However, Topps was brand-new at this action-shot stuff, and sometimes the photos lacked action, or contained needless distractions. Bob Gibson’s card has both problems. His card front shows him just standing on the mound between pitches, with his image dissolving into the crowd in the background. The action shot of No. 513, Nolan Ryan—in his last season with the Mets before being shunted off to Anaheim in a disastrous trade for Fregosi—also has a distraction problem: the pitching motion is nice, but the billboard in the background makes the card look more like an ad for Royal Crown Cola.

Ryan showed up again—this time as a spectator—on the card front of No. 355, Bud Harrelson. There is some nice activity at second base in the shot, with Harrelson tagging an Astro while the ump and the Mets second baseman look on. However, the action is shown from a distance; the foreground includes the back of Ryan’s uniform number as he watches from the mound. A little cropping (as shown below), and this would have been a much better shot, in my opinion.

But overall the action shots worked very well, and proved to be a hit with collectors. Less successful—on both the front and back sides of the cards—was how Topps dealt with the always-tricky issue of players who switched teams after their card photos had been taken. For the airbrushers, the Old English White Sox logo was a particular challenge. Not surprisingly, they had more success with the small black-and-white shots on the backs of the cards. (It’s also likely that some of the shots on the backs of the cards came from other sources for black-and-white headshots, like team media guides.) For Pat Kelly (No. 413) and future Harry Caray whipping boy Tom Egan (No. 537), Topps neatly avoided having to airbrush the cap of the photo on the front by using a shot looking up at the bill of the player’s cap. No logo to mess with!

For Rick Reichardt (among many others), Topps employed the familiar strategy of showing the player capless.

The airbrusher actually did a pretty fair job with the front of John Purdin’s (No. 748) card. As for Don O’Riley (No. 679)… not so much. Even the photo on the back of O’Riley’s card is pretty bad.

Of course, the White Sox were hardly the only challenge to Topps’ airbrushers. In a few cases, late roster moves left Topps with no time to airbrush logos onto either the front or back sides of the cards—resulting in a number of caps with no team logo at all. Jim Qualls (No. 731), forever immortal (and to some, notorious) as the man who ruined Tom Seaver’s 1969 perfect game bid, was dealt from Montreal to Cincinnati so late (March 31) that the back of his card still identifies him as “the Expos’ only switch-hitter.” For me, the red paint job on the on the front of Qualls’ card brought back memories of Holden Caulfield in his red hunting hat.

Marv Staehle (No. 663), signed by the Braves on April 3 after being released by Montreal, wound up looking like the guy who filled your tank at the Sunoco station on Route 23.

By 1971, “Rookie star” Archie Reynolds (No. 664), one of a trio of Reynolds rooks on the same card, had already seen brief action in three major league seasons, and he had been a part of the Angels’ organization since mid-1970. So what’s with that painted-on cap, Arch?

Dick Williams (No. 714) is an even bigger curiosity. Williams was named manager of the Oakland Athletics in late January of 1971, and Topps had time to utilize a non-airbrushed shot of Williams in the familiar white cap worn by A’s managers and coaches on the back of his card. So how did Williams wind up in the goofy green cap on the card front?

One final mystery. Topps had no worries about Hank Aaron (No. 400) changing teams… and surely they had more than a few Aaron images to choose from. Yet they somehow chose to use the same photo—nothing special, to be honest—on both sides of Bad Henry’s card.

Ah, but I protesteth too much; despite the occasional slip-ups, this is a wonderful card set. Both the front and back sides of the cards contain interesting innovations… and while the use of action shots is the primary innovation on the front side of the cards, there are some wonderful posed shots as well. Here are a few of my favorites.

Quiz answer: Ron Woods, who would be traded by the Yankees to the Expos in June of 1971 in exchange for former 1969 Mets hero Ron Swoboda, still awaits a SABR bio.

A Little Treasure Chest

Brace, Conlon, McWilliams, McCarthy. McCarthy? Most card collectors and hardcore baseball fans have heard of, or encountered, the photography of George Brace, Charles Conlon and Doug McWilliams. For some reason, J.D. McCarthy has slipped through the cracks.

He shouldn’t have. McCarthy, from near Detroit, was a top level photographer, clicking away product that players used as postcards to answer fan mail or promote their bowling alleys and pizza parlors (McCarthy entries are scattered throughout the Standard Catalog), and that Topps used on a freelance basis. McCarthy archives had made it through various hands, and the bottom of the collection ended up with Bob Lemke, formerly of Krause Publications and one-time editor of the Standard Catalog. He wrote about it here.

Bob makes the point that the collection went through multiple owners, and, by the time it got to him, had been picked over, the Hall of Famers and big stars had disappeared. Which leads me to this post.

Back in 1986, I was visiting Cooperstown and, of course, Baseball Nostalgia. The shop, co-owned by inaugural Burdick Award Winner Mike Aronstein, was in its old location, at what is now the batting range. I picked up my usual odds and ends, like the current San Francisco Giants yearbook, and this little gem. (I’d always been under the impression that Sports Design Products was an Aronstein company, but Andrew Aronstein assured me it was not.)

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I had never heard of McCarthy, and had no idea of what would be contained within this plastic box, but, man, what’s inside was a marvel then, and still is now. It’s a 24-card set, matte-finish (if not matte, non-glossy), with brilliant photos and a simple, 1969 Topps design. SDP clearly had some big plans for the superstar portraits of McCarthy, hoping to get on board the card boom. Seemingly those dreams were never realized.

Here’s the entirety of the set:

109912830_10220672334952715_600402454044477660_n

An up close look at these two beauts:

(The backs have little to offer, but I know you “card back” guys care.)

114741042_10220672334712709_4691486806424080435_n

 

While still cheap in price, the McCarthy set is high in aesthetic value. Track one down.

Misery Loves Company

Now that Beckett has published a short post about this I’m sort of obliged to write a longer version detailing the Al Kaline debacle.

I don’t chase shortprints but I enjoy looking through them every new release. Very often the photographs there are more interesting and remind me of the variety that we saw in the 1990s. Plus the old players are always an interesting reflection of the kinds of players who still resonate today.

When Series 2 dropped, I did my usual look through. The Andrew McCutchen is awesome but what stopped me was the Al Kaline. I’m looking for good/interesting photos in the short prints. I’m not expecting to see a photo showing the wrong player.

Yup. That’s not Kaline in the photo. How do I know? Because I made this exact mistake with this exact photo only nine months earlier.

I enjoy writing Through the Mail autograph requests but I also refuse to send things through the mail which I don’t want to risk losing—say, for example, a vintage card of Al Kaline. Even though he was such a great signer (typically turning things around under 20 days and often closer to 10) I just refuse to tempt fate with the USPS like that. Instead I created a custom card by searching around around the web for photos I liked and dropping them into a template I had created.

Last November I sent a couple custom cards off to Al with a note asking him to keep the extras and hoping he enjoyed them. A week and a half later they came back to me. I was not expecting the result.

Gulp.

At first I was mortified. This is the most embarrassing kind of mistake to make when autograph hunting. Then I double-checked Getty* and confirmed that I’d done my homework. Did I make a mistake. Yes. But it wasn’t through either lack of caring or lack of effort on my part. I hadn’t just grabbed a photo, I’d made sure that multiple places including a somewhat authoritative source had identified the player.

*Note: As of July 17, 2020 Getty has corrected its database to reflect that the photo is actually of Don Demeter.

At this point I became much more comfortable with the humor of the situation. Did I trust Kaline over Getty? Absolutely. So I tossed it onto Twitter so people could laugh at both me and Getty while also hoping that the hive mind could identify who the mystery player was.

Many people—including many Tigers fans—confirmed that they’d always thought this was Kaline as well. Only after realizing that it wasn’t him did the hive mind quickly nominate Don Demeter. Similar build and swing. Same time period. He certainly seemed like the most-likely suspect.

Thankfully, Demeter is great responding to autograph requests as well. I acquired a card of him, wrote a letter explaining the screw up, included one of the customs, and asked him if he could confirm that the photo was indeed him.

While getting the card signed was fun, this was one of the rare autograph returns where the autograph request was always going to be less important than the response to my question. Much to my pleasure and satisfaction, Demeter answered my question and confirmed that it was him.

His response was actually this sketch. It’s pretty conclusive to me and makes a fantastic companion piece to the Kaline and Demeter cards in my autograph binder. I just wish there were a way to submit this to Getty so they can update their database.

As a custom card maker, it’s always somewhat flattering to see Topps select a photo that I’ve already used on a custom. In this case though, as soon as I saw the Kaline short print I started laughing. I recognized the photo instantly and knew exactly what had happened. While I’ve already made peace with my mistake, seeing someone else fall for the same thing just makes me feel even better about it.

While I’m sad that this is sort of a RIP Kaline card for Topps, I’m glad that he didn’t have to deal with being asked to sign it. I would however be thrilled to see someone ask Don Demeter to sign it. That would be awesome.

On cropping and layers

For most of baseball card history there have been two basic types of card designs. Either the photo is placed in a box* or the player is silhouetted onto a background.** Both of these designs are pretty straightforward with their image requirements in that designers only have to think about what is and isn’t shown in the photos.

*Straightforward but none more pure of an example than 1953 Bowman.

**1914 Cracker Jacks, 1949 Bowman, 1958 Topps, and many of the inserts from the 1980s to today.

There’s a third design though which took over cards in the 1990s and has made photo cropping difficult ever since. Rather than putting photos in boxes the trend toward full-bleed cards has created design after design that layers text and other graphic elements on top of the photo itself.

While it’s true that this design took over in the 1990s and was made extremely easy to do by foil stamping, it’s important to realize that its ancestry has been in cards for decades and in fact tended to surface every decade. So let’s go back to one of the first such designs.

Yup. 1957. I sometimes jokingly refer to this as proto-Stadium Club except that the photos themselves are pretty standard Topps photos that you’d expect to see until about 1991 or so. Posed shots showing a player’s upper body, headshots, and a few full-body “action” (at this point still posed) images.

The first thing to point out here is that Topps likes to put the players’ heads as high in the frame that it can. The next thing to look at—specifically in the Kluszewski and Thompson cards—is how Topps deals with the text overlapping the image. Topps likes to crop at players’ waists and at their necklines. In 1957 this is frequently where the top of the text starts but there’s another half inch of image visible under the text.

On the upper-body portraits this extra half inch can give us a little more information about the location of the photo and allow us to see the field and stadiums.

Photographically, these photos were also composed somewhat loose since the image area of the film is huge* and the photographer knew things would be cropped later. This is why in the Gomez card there’s so much grass in the foreground.

*at least 2 and a quarter inches square and quite likely more like 4 inches by 5 inches.

Now we flash forward a decade. On a lot of other sets* before this the image frame is knocking off a corner of the photo. This isn’t the same kind of design/photography issue since most of the photos are somewhat centered so there’s rarely something of import in the corners.

*eg. 1962, 1963, and 1965. Plus in 1966 there’s a layering effect in the corner.

1967 though is exactly like 1957 only there’s text at both the top and the bottom of the card now. Topps is doing the same thing as it did in 1957 too except that the players’ heads are now a little lower in the frame so that the names and positions can fit. The waist and neckline croppings though are pretty close to the 1957 croppings.

The net result here is that we get to see a lot more stadium details in many of the cards—giving the set a photographic character which differs from the other 1960s Topps offerings.

The Fuentes card though shows the dangers of this kind of design. Unlike the 1957 Gomez, Fuentes’s feet—and even his glove—are covered by the team name. This isn’t a big problem with a posed “action” photo but becomes much more of an issue when we move into the age of action photography.

I’ll jump to Japan for the 1970s since the Calbee sets of that decade deserve a mention. It’s obviously doing something very similar with extending the photo under the text. At the same time the simplicity of the text almost makes it an absence of design. In a good way.

It might be because I can’t read the text but the way it’s handled encourages me to not see it. Not because it’s not readable. Quite the opposite in fact. The way the text changes from black to white on the Sadaharu Oh card is handled masterfully in how my brain barely notices it. It’s there as information but manages to not take anything away from the photos.

It is worth noting though that the cropping on Oh and Davey Johnson is pretty similar to Topps’s standard cropping. And that third card of Hisao Niura tying his shoes has enough foreground space to give the text plenty of room to be legible.

Toppswise I skipped 1969 since it’s such a photographic nightmare that I don’t feel like it’s a fair to look at the photos. (Offhand though it’s interesting to note that it tends to crop the photos tighter at the bottom than 1967’s or 1957’s designs do.) 1980 is close, super close, to being included but it still feels like more of a corner-based design. Which brings us to 1988.

Not much to note with 1988 except for the layering of the player on top of the team name which is on top of the background. This is a wonderfully subtle bit of design that allows the photos to feel like they’re cropped similarly to the rest of Topps’s cards. Instead of getting more image area the layering doesn’t affect the image too much.

1991 brought us Stadium Club and the beginning of the full-bleed era of cards. Looking at this first set shows both that Topps was being pretty considerate with its cropping and how things would start to break.

Where earlier sets had the benefit of posed photos which could be cropped, as action photography began to be the priority for card companies the room for cropping started to decrease. For every card like Kent Anderson where there’s enough room for the graphics there’s a card like Damon Berryhill where the graphic is starting to intrude into the image.

1992 Stadium Club shows an alternative to just slapping a graphic on the bottom of the card. That Topps moves the graphic depending on where it best fits the photo is fantastic.

It’s also a lot of work since it requires each card to be designed individually. Instead of positioning an image into a template, this design requires the image and graphic to be adjusted until they work together. Find the best cropping, then adjust the graphic. This extra amount of work is probably why this approach hasn’t really been revisited since 1992.

By 1993 the standard operating procedure had been set. This design captures the way most sets ever since have been designed. A basic template, drop the picture in. Don’t worry if the graphic obscures an important part of the photo.

One of my pet peeves in the full-bleed era is when there’s a photo of a play at a base and the graphic obscures the actual play. The Bip Roberts is a textbook example of this. Great play at the plate except the focus of the play is obscured by the Stadium Club logo.

This is a shame since in 1993 Upper Deck showed how to do it right. The layering effect like 1988 Topps at the top allows the image to be cropped nice and tight at the top of the frame. Upper Deck though selected photos and cropped them to have empty space at the bottom.

You wouldn’t crop photos in general this way but as a background for the graphics it works perfectly. It forces the photos to be zoomed out enough that you can see the entire player and get a sense of what he’s doing within the game.

Most of the 1990s and 2000s however look like these. I could’ve pulled a bunch more sets—especially from Pacific and Upper Deck—here but they’re all kind of the same. Big foil graphics that cover up important parts of the photo. Some sort of foil stamping or transparency effect that cuts off the players’ feet.

Instead of cropping loosely like 1993 Upper Deck most of the cards in these decades feel like the photos were cropped before being placed in the graphics.

It’s easy to blame the card companies here but this is also a photography thing. Portrait photographers often find the crop after they take the photo. They use larger-format film and understand that the publication might need to crop to fit a yet-to-be-determined layout. Action photographers though get in tight and capture the best moment. This is great for the photos but not so great with baseball cards.

Baseball is a horizontal sport and there’s no reason to include dead foreground space. The only reason to include that space if you know that you’re shooting for a baseball card design that’s going to need it.

We’ll make a brief stop at 2008 though. This isn’t a transparency or overlay design but it’s doing something similar. Rather than the usual cropping at a corner of the image box, Topps placed its logo in a uvula at the top of the image box. Right where it would normally place the players’ heads.

The result? Very similar to 1967’s effect where the photos get zoomed out  a little and you see more background. The problem? These photos are already somewhat small and the change to mostly-action means that in most of them you’re just seeing more blurry crowds.

Fred Lewis is emblematic of the standard cropping. Small player image with lots of wasted space in the upper corners. That the posed photos like the Matt Cain are often bare skies at spring training locations instead of in Major League stadiums makes the added “information” there generally uninteresting.

All of this is a shame since the Tim Lincecum shows that when a selected photo is not impacted by the uvula, not only is the photo area not that small but the design can actually look pretty nice.

Okay. To contemporary cards and Topps’s recent dalliance with full bleed designs in flagship. I’m looking at 2017 here since it’s kind of the worst but 2016 to 2018 all do this. The transparency at the bottom of the cards is huge now. Yes it gets blurred out a bit but the photo information still needs to be there and as a result the cropping has to be even tighter.

As much as Topps was drifting toward in-your-face all-action shots, the actual designs of these cards sot of prevents any other kind of action. They also prioritize action that focuses in the top half of the frame. Any plays at a base gate stomped on by the design and even photos like the Chase Headley which don’t focus low in the frame are pretty much ruined too.

It’s easy to blame the TV graphics in Flagship but even Stadium Club—a set I love—has this same problem. On action photos the name/type often gets in the way of the image (compare Tim Anderson to the 1993 Upper Deck Lou Whitaker) but it’s the otherwise-wonderful wide-angle photos which fare the worst.

As the angle gets wider and the players get smaller, the odds that the text becomes intrusive increase tremendously. On Dexter Fowler’s card he’s the same size as the text and, as great as the photo is, the design of the card ruins it. Same goes with the Jose Berrios where the text is covering the entire mound and the ground fog Topps adds for contrast covers the whole playing field.

Which brings us to 2020 and a design that gets a lot of flak because it features sideways names.* What isn’t mentioned very frequently is how moving the transparency effect to the side of the card results in tremendously better photos and photo cropping.

*I don’t mind the sideways names except that I think they should’ve been rotated 180° so that when paged the horizontal cards don’t end up upside down.

All of a sudden we can see players’ feet again. Images aren’t all as in-your-face. We can have action images at second base where you can actually figure out what’s going on. Instead of cropping out the bottom of an image which a photographer has already framed, this design uses the space the photographers already provide for players to “move into.”*

*In action photography you’re generally trying to give the subject some room to move into the frame.

More importantly, it opens up the possibility for great photos that would never have worked in the previous full-bleed designs. For example, Omar Narvaez’s image is impossible to use in any design that puts transparency at the bottom of the card. Even Stadium Club. But 2020 Topps is flexible enough that it can use a wider variety of images.

I hope Topps learns some lessons from 2020 and that if we’re to see further full-bleed designs that they’ll be done in such a way so as to not get in the way of the images or to take advantage of the Transparency to give us more interesting photos.

Through a glass, darkly

Last year, I purchased the 1981 and 1982 Fleer sets for essentially the shipping cost.  Both sets were in binders, but the pocket pages were the old PVC type with the cards inserted two to a pocket.  I “freed” the 1981 set last year and finally did the same for 1982 recently.  This re-paging task allowed me to closely examine the 1982 cards-which left me astonished at the poor quality of photos, bad lighting and odd poses.  There are a few positive aspects, but one must dig deeply.

Since 1982 was Fleer’s second go-round, one would assume that they would strive to produce a quality product to make up for the mistake-laden inaugural 1981 set.  Instead, consistently murky images make season two a step back in quality.

1982 National League MVP Dale Murphy is an example of badly blurred image.  You would think that an in focus shot of a player posing with a bat could be executed properly.  Of course, the fuzzy images may have been the result printing issues.  But if this were the case, why didn’t Fleer fix the issue once they saw the proofs?

Both Cal Ripken and teammate Lynn Sakata are typical examples of the “Fleer fuzz,” and Jack Clark shows blurred action.

“Big Daddy” Rick Reuschel is viewed through a camera darkly.  Most of his card is black.  The low light for Gary Allenson is a typical shot of a stationary figure in the daytime that still comes out dark and out of focus.

If poor photo quality wasn’t enough, many of poses are head scratchers.  Brian Kingman is a good example of the fixation on photographing left-handed pitchers from behind.  There are way too many shots of players’ backs.

Another overused pose is to have players seated alone in the dugout. It was as if Fleer was anticipating social distancing requirements 38 years ago.

Photos taken around the batting cage were common for decades.  But Fleer takes it to a new level by photographing players in the cage.  A few players taking batting practice might work as a fresh angle, but they took this idea and ran it into the ground.

And, what is with the pose used for Jack Morris?  He is barely in the frame. Also, there may be a UFO in the background.

Now that I have ranted and raved, let’s look at some of the good aspects of the set. I like the Fernando Valenzuela shot showing him looking to the sky.  Also, you must appreciate Manny Trillo’s World Champions jacket. Steve Stone in front of the helmet rack is another excellent shot.

Two players with same name are found in this set: former Seattle Pilot Mike Marshall and the Dodger outfielder with the identical moniker.  I didn’t include this in a previous post on players with the same name, since I only looked at Topps. 

Speaking of ex-Seattle Pilots, you will find Fred “Chicken” Stanley on the A’s.  He is the last Pilot to be in a base set as a player (1983).

There are several great “hair” cards.  John Lowenstein sheds his cap to show off an impressive perm.  Danny Darwin offers up an excellent example of “helmet” hair.

Finally, Fleer provides Carlton Fisk fans with three different cards.  He is shown with the Red Sox on Rich Dauer’s card, with the White Sox on his regular card and with his namesake, Steve Carlton, on a multi-player card.

Fleer saw through a glass, darkly. The result was a most ungodly, photographic apocalypse.

1973 – Ugliest Topps Baseball Set Ever

“This is the best series I think we’ve ever done. I’m very excited about the whole thing already.” Sy Berger, Topps president, prior to 1973 cards hitting the shelves.

(Quote from the book – Baseball Card Flipping, Trading And Bubble Gum)

Rather than binge watch the Tiger King I decided to spend the last 3 nights cataloging my 1973 Topps Baseball cards to see how close I am to having a complete set. I obtained these cards after the great basement flood of 1987. The cards originally belonged to my younger brother. He had stored his baseball card collection in the basement of my parent’s then new home in Maine. Due to some faulty landscaping some water came into the basement during a downpour and damaged some his collection.

My brother no longer wanted the damaged collection and instead of throwing out the cards my mother miraculously called me to see I wanted them. I told her I would gladly take all the cards. A week or so later my parents arrived at my house with a large cardboard box stuffed with cards. My mother had dried out the cards that got wet by laying them on a dry floor and running a fan across them.

The box contained a mishmash of Topps cards that ranged from 1966 to 1980. Most of the cards were in good shape – either no water damage or only a very small water spot. There were also some cards that had seen better days.

There were a lot of cards of hall of famers from various years including this nice 1967 Mickey Mantle.

The bulk of the collection was comprised of 1973 cards. Almost all of the 1973 cards came through the ordeal in nice shape. Even before cataloging the cards I knew I almost had a complete set. I have nearly all the cards of the hall of famers, including the Mike Schmidt rookie card.

Mike Schmidt Rookie -Card Number 615

The Bad and The Ugly

It was also clear before cataloging these cards, that this was the ugliest set ever produced by Topps.

From a pure printing perspective all of the cards lack brightness and pop. The design of the ’73 cards lacks imagination and the white borders contribute to the dullness of the cards.

My biggest beef with these cards is the photography. The quality of the action images used in a significant percentage of the cards is in many cases very low. Most of the action shots were taken during afternoon games creating high contrast situations with the caps shading the faces of the players and the white uniforms reflecting too much light. In a post from 2016, Topps, according to baseball photographer extraordinaire Doug McWilliams, insisted on the use of slow ASA 100 film. This did not help matters when it came to freezing the action, resulting in fuzzy images or images that required a lot of massaging in order to make them acceptable.

I have included in the slide show below a sampling of problematic cards of future hall of famers and stars from this era. There are photos that are zoomed so far out you don’t know who the subject is (image on Bobby Bonds card would have been a better choice for the Willie Stargell card). There are photos where faces are in shadows and photos which have been airbrushed beyond all recognition. There are a few photos that have been cropped bizarrely (I still can’t find Steve Garvey). And there are photos were the composition is mind boggling (Willie McCovey and Johnny Bench checking out a foul ball. The Hit King popping up. Is that really Thurman Munson?).

Slide Show Featuring Some of Ugliest Topps Cards of Hall of Famers and Stars Ever Produced

If you are a Joe Rudi fan you are out of luck. You get another card of Gene Tenace.

The Good

There are some really nice cards in this set. Call me old school, but most of the cards in this set that work for me are the ones with the posed shots. Cards that also work for me are the action shots of Aaron and Clemente which are two of the best in this set. And it was nice that Topps brought back the cards of the playoffs and the World Series.

Slide Show of Good Cards

After cataloging the cards, I have found out that I am only 50 cards shy of having a complete set of 660 cards (not counting the variations in many of the managers / coaches cards). Only two of the missing cards are Hall of Famers.

I even have 22 of the 24 Blue Team Checklist cards that were supposedly only inserted in the last series.

I would be interested on your take on the 1973 set. Let me know by way of a comment if you agree or disagree with me on the 1973 set being the ugliest set that Topps has ever produced.

The T206 photo project

Editor’s note: For the #StayHomeWithSABR video presentation of this article, click here!

The SABR Baseball Cards Research Committee is working with tobacco card enthusiast Matt Haynes of Alton, IL, to assemble the most complete
(virtual) collection of T206 source images available.

A graphic designer by trade, Matt’s inspiration in beginning this project was the simple beauty and artistry of the T206 cards themselves. Like many of our readers, Matt was an avid collector in his youth but took a long hiatus from the Hobby when “real life” took over. It was the proximity of a local card shop to a new job that lured Matt back into collecting, first focusing on top-shelf superstars of the 1950s but now exclusively on the 524-card set known as the Monster.

Starting from more than 40 images already cataloged at the T206 Resource photo gallery, adding the finds of several other hobbyists from card forums such as Net54 Baseball and Tobacco Row, and adding images from his own research, Matt was able to assemble 86 card-image pairs for this initial post, already the most available anywhere on the Web. Now we are asking you, our readers, for your help in finding more. (See contact info at end of post.)

Please excuse some wonky formatting as Jason makes updates to the table, including the addition of more unmatched T206 cards to speed up your photo hunts.

CURRENT COUNT: 213/524

240240ImagePlayerTeamSource
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Ed Abbaticchio FrontAbbaticchio, Ed
(Blue Sleeves)
PIT
undefinedAbbaticchio, Ed
(Brown Sleeves)
PIT
Abbott, FredTOL1903 Carl Horner portrait
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Bill Abstein FrontAbstein, BillPIT
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Doc Adkins FrontAdkins, DocBAL
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Whitey Alperman FrontAlperman, WhiteyBRO
Ames, Red
(Hands At Chest)
NY
(NL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Red Ames FrontAmes, Red
(Hands Above Head)
NY
(NL)
undefinedAmes, Red
(Portrait)
NY
(NL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO John Anderson FrontAnderson, JohnPRO
Arellanes, FrankBOS
(AL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Harry Armbruster FrontArmbruster, HermanSTP
Arndt, HarryPRO
Atz, JakeCHI
(AL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Home Run Baker FrontBaker, FrankPHI
(AL)
Ball, Neal
(CLE)
CLE
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Neal Ball FrontBall, Neal
(NY)
NY
(AL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Jap Barbeau FrontBarbeau, JapSTL
(NL)
Barger, CyROC
Barry, JackPHI
(AL)
Barry, ShadMIL
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Jack Bastian FrontBastian, JackSAT
Batch, EmilROC
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Johnny Bates FrontBates, JohnnyBOS
(NL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Harry Bay FrontBay, HarryNAS
Beaumont, GingerBOS
(NL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Fred Beck FrontBeck, FredBOS
(NL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Beals Becker FrontBecker, BealsBOS
(NL)
Beckley, JakeKC
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO George Bell FrontBell, George
(Hands Above Head)
BRO
undefinedBell, George
(Follow Thru)
BRO
undefinedBender, Chief
(No Trees)
PHI
(AL)
Bender, Chief
(With Trees)
PHI
(AL)
Bender, Chief
(Portrait)
PHI
(AL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Bill Bergen FrontBergen, Bill
(Catching)
BRO
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Bill Bergen FrontBergen, Bill
(Batting)
BRO
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Heinie Berger FrontBerger, HeinieCLE
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Bill Bernhard FrontBernhard, BillNAS
Bescher, Bob
(Hands In Air)
CIN
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Bob Bescher FrontBescher, Bob
(Portrait)
CIN
undefinedBirmingham, JoeCLE
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Lena Blackburne FrontBlackburne, LenaPRO
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Jack Bliss FrontBliss, JackSTL
(NL)
Bowerman, FrankBOS
(NL)
Bradley, Bill
(Portrait)
CLE
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Bill Bradley FrontBradley, Bill
(With Bat)
CLE
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Dave Brain FrontBrain, DaveBUF
Bransfield, KittyPHI
(NL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Roy Brashear FrontBrashear, RoyKC
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Ted Breitenstein FrontBreitenstein, TedNOLA
undefinedBresnahan, Roger
(Batting)
STL
(NL)
undefinedBresnahan, Roger
(Portrait)
STL
(NL)
Bridwell, Al
(Portrait – No Cap)
NY
(NL)
Bridwell, Al
(Portrait – With Cap)
NY
(NL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO George Browne FrontBrown, George
(CHI)
CHI
(NL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO George Browne FrontBrown, George
(WAS)
WAS
Brown, Mordecai
(Chi On Shirt)
CHI
(NL)
Brown, Mordecai
(Cubs On Shirt)
CHI
(NL)
Brown, Mordecai
(Portrait)
CHI
(NL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Al Burch FrontBurch, Al
(Batting)
BRO
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Al Burch FrontBurch, Al
(Fielding)
BRO
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Fred Burchell FrontBurchell, FredBUF
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Jimmy Burke FrontBurke, JimmyIND
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Bill Burns FrontBurns, BillCHI
(AL)
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Donie Bush FrontBush, DonieDET
Butler, JohnROC
1909-11 American Tobacco Company T206 White Border #NNO Bobby Byrne FrontByrne, BobbySTL
(NL)
Camnitz, Howie
(Arms Folded)
PIT
undefinedCamnitz, Howie
(Arm At Side)
PIT
Camnitz, Howie
(Hands Above Head)
PIT
Campbell, BillyCIN
Carey, ScoopsMEM
Carr, CharleyIND
Carrigan, BillBOS
(AL)
Casey, DocMON
Cassidy, PeterBAL
undefinedChance, Frank
(Batting)
CHI
(NL)
Chance, Frank
(Portrait – Red)
CHI
(NL)
Chance, Frank
(Portrait – Yellow)
CHI
(NL)
Chappelle, BillROC
Charles, ChappieSTL
(NL)
Chase, Hal
(Holding Trophy)
NY
(AL)
Chase, Hal
(Portrait – Blue)
NY
(AL)
undefinedChase, Hal
(Portrait – Pink)
NY
(AL)
Chase, Hal
(Black Cap)
NY
(AL)
Chase, Hal
(White Cap)
NY
(AL)
Chesbro, Jack NY
(AL)
Cicotte, EdBOS
(AL)
Clancy, BillBUF
Clark, JoshCOL
Clarke, Fred
(Batting)
PIT
Clarke, Fred
(Portrait)
PIT
Clarke, J.J.CLE
Clymer, BillCOL
Cobb, Ty
(Portrait – Green)
DET
Cobb, Ty
(Portrait – Red)
DET
Cobb, Ty
(Bat Off Shoulder)
DET
Cobb, Ty
(Bat On Shoulder)
DET
Coles, Cad AUG
Collins, EddiePHI
(AL)
Collins, JimmyMIN
Congalton, BunkCOL
Conroy, Wid
(Fielding)
WAS
Conroy, Wid
(With Bat)
WAS
Covaleski, HarryPHI
(NL)
undefinedCrandall, Doc
(Portrait No Cap)
NY
(NL)
Crandall, Doc
(Portrait With Cap)
NY
(NL)
Cranston, BillMEM
Cravath, GavvyMIN
Crawford, Sam
(Throwing)
DET
Crawford, Sam
(With Bat)
DET
Cree, BirdieNY
(AL)
Criger, LouSTL
(AL)
Criss, DodeSTL
(AL)
Cross, MonteIND
Dahlen, Bill
(BOS)
BOS
(NL)
Dahlen, Bill
(BRO)
BRO
Davidson, PaulIND
Davis, GeorgeCHI
(AL)
Davis, Harry
(Davis On Front)
PHI
(AL)
Davis, Harry
(H. Davis On Front)
PHI
(AL)
Delehanty, FrankLOU
Delehanty, JimWAS
Demmitt, Ray
(NY)
NY
(AL)
Demmitt, Ray
(STL, AL)
STL
(AL)
Dessau, RubeBAL
Devlin, ArtNY
(NL)
undefinedDeVore, JoshNY
(NL)
Dineen, BillSTL
(AL)
Donlin, Mike
(Fielding)
NY
(NL)
Donlin, Mike
(Seated)
NY
(NL)
Donlin, Mike
(With Bat)
NY
(NL)
Donohue, JiggsCHI
(AL)
Donovan, Wild Bill
(Portrait)
DET
Donovan, Wild Bill
(Throwing)
DET
Dooin, RedPHI
(NL)
Doolan, Mickey
(Batting)
PHI
(NL)
Doolan, Mickey
(Fielding)
PHI
(NL)
Doolin, MickeyPHI
(NL)
Dorner, GusKC
Dougherty, Patsy
(Arm In Air)
CHI
(AL)
Dougherty, Patsy
(Portrait)
CHI
(AL)
Downey, Tom
(Batting)
CIN
Downey, Tom
(Fielding)
CIN
Downs, JerryMIN
Doyle, Joe
(N.Y. Nat’l)
NY
(NL)
Doyle, Joe
(N.Y.)
NY
(AL)
Doyle, Larry
(Portrait)
NY
(NL)
Doyle, Larry
(Throwing)
NY
(NL)
Doyle, Larry
(With Bat)
NY
(NL)
Dubuc, JeanCIN
undefinedDuffy, HughCHI
(AL)
Chicago Daily News, 1910
Dunn, JackBAL
Dunn, JoeBRO
undefinedDurham, BullNY
(NL)
Dygert, JimmyPHI
(AL)
Easterly, TedCLE
Egan, DickCIN
Elberfeld, Kid
(Portrait – NY)
NY
(AL)
Elberfeld, Kid
(Portrait – WAS)
WAS
Elberfeld, Kid
(Fielding)
WAS
Ellam, RoyNAS
Engle, ClydeNY
(AL)
Evans, SteveSTL
(NL)
Evers, Johnny
(Portrait)
CHI
(NL)
Evers, Johnny
(CHI On Shirt – Yellow Sky)
CHI
(NL)
Evers, Johnny
(Cubs On Shirt – Blue Sky)
CHI
(NL)
Ewing, BobCIN
Ferguson, CecilBOS
(NL)
Ferris, HobeSTL
(AL)
Fiene, Lou
(Portrait)
CHI
(AL)
Fiene, Lou
(Throwing)
CHI
(AL)
Flanagan, SteamerBUF
Fletcher, ArtNY
(NL)
Flick, ElmerCLE
Ford, RussNY
(AL)
Foster, EdCHA
Freeman, JerryTOL
Frill, JohnNY
(AL)
Fritz, CharlieNOLA
Fromme, ArtCIN
Gandil, ChickCHI
(AL)
Ganley, BobWAS
Ganzel, JohnROC
Gasper, HarryCIN
Geyer, RubeSTL
(NL)
Gibson, GeorgePIT
Gilbert, BillySTL
(NL)
Goode, WilburCLE
Graham, BillSTL
(AL)
Graham, PeachesBOS
(NL)
Gray, DollyWAS
Greminger, EdMTGM
Griffith, Clark
(Batting)
CIN
Griffith, Clark
(Portrait)
CIN
Grimshaw, MooseTOR
Groom, BobWAS
Guiheen, TomPOR
Hahn, EdCHI
(AL)
Hall, BobBAL
Hallman, BillKC
Hannifan, JackJC
Hart, BillLR
Hart, JimmyMTGM
Hartsel, TopsyPHI
(AL)
Hayden, JackIND
Helm, J. RossCOL
Hemphill, CharlieNY
(AL)
Herzog, Buck
(BOS)
BOS
(NL)
Herzog, Buck
(NY)
NY
(NL)
Hickman, GordonMOB
Hinchman, BillCLE
Hinchman, HarryTOL
Hoblitzell, DickCIN
Hoffman, DannySTL
(AL)
Hoffman, IzzyPRO

Hofman, SollyCHI
(NL)
Hooker, BockLYN
Howard, DelCHI
(NL)
Howard, ErnieSAV
Howell, Harry
(Hand At Waist)
STL
(AL)
Howell, Harry
(Portrait)
STL
(AL)
Huggins, Miller
(Hands At Mouth)
CIN
Huggins, Miller
(Portrait)
CIN
Hulswitt, RudySTL
(NL)
Hummel, JohnBRO
Hunter, GeorgeBRO
Isbell, FrankCHI
(AL)
Jacklitsch, FredPHI
(NL)
Jackson, JimmyBAL
Jennings, Hughie
(One Hand Showing)
DET
Jennings, Hughie
(Two Hands Showing)
DET
Jennings, Hughie
(Portrait)
DET
Johnson, Walter
(Glove At Chest)
WAS
undefinedJohnson, Walter
(Portrait)
WAS
Jones, Fielder
(Hands At Hips)
CHI
(AL)
undefinedJones, Fielder
(Portrait)
CHI
(AL)
undefinedJones, DavyDET
Jones, TomSTL
(AL)
Jordan, DutchATL
Jordan, Tim
(Batting)
BRO
Jordan, Tim
(Portrait)
BRO
Joss, Addie
(Hands At Chest)
CLE
Joss, Addie
(Portrait)
CLE
Karger, EdCIN
Keeler, Willie
(Portrait)
NY
(AL)
Keeler, Willie
(With Bat)
NY
(AL)
Kelley, JoeTOR
Kiernan, J.F.COL
Killian, Ed
(Hands At Chest)
DET
Killian, Ed
(Portrait)
DET
King, FrankDAN
Kisinger, RubeBUF
Kleinow, Red
(BOS – Catching)
BOS
(AL)
Kleinow, Red
(NY – Catching)
NY
(AL)
Kleinow, Red
(NY – With Bat)
NY
(AL)
Kling, JohnnyCHI
(NL)
Knabe, OttoPHI
(NL)
Knight, Jack
(Portrait)
NY
(AL)
Knight, Jack
(With Bat)
NY
(AL)
Konetchy, Ed
(Glove Above Head)
STL
(NL)
Konetchy, Ed
(Glove Near Ground)
STL
(NL)
Krause, Harry
(Pitching)
PHI
(AL)
Krause, Harry
(Portrait)
PHI
(AL)
Kroh, RubeCHI
(NL)
Kruger, OttoCOL
Lafitte, JamesMAC
Lajoie, Nap
(Portrait)
CLE
Lajoie, Nap
(Throwing)
CLE
undefinedLajoie, Nap
(With Bat)
CLE
Lake, Joe
(NY)
NY
(AL)
Lake, Joe
(STL – Ball In Hand)
STL
(AL)
Lake, Joe
(STL – No Ball)
STL
(AL)
LaPorte, FrankNY
(AL)
Latham, ArlieNY
(NL)
Lattimore, BillTOL
Lavender, JimmyPRO
Leach, Tommy
(Bending Over)
PIT
Leach, Tommy
(Portrait)
PIT
Leifield, Lefty
(Batting)
PIT
Leifield, Lefty
(Pitching)
PIT
Lennox, EdBRO
Lentz, HarryLR
Liebhardt, GlennCLE
Lindaman, ViveBOS
(NL)
undefinedLipe, PerryRIC
Livingstone, PaddyPHI
(AL)
undefinedLobert, HansCIN
Lord, HarryBOS
(AL)
Lumley, HarryBRO
undefinedLundgren, Carl
(CHI)
CHI
(NL)
undefinedLundgren, Carl
(KC)
KC
Maddox, NickPIT
Magie, SherryPHI
(NL)
Magee, Sherry
(Portrait)
PHI
(NL)
undefinedMagee, Sherry
(With Bat)
PHI
(NL)
Malarkey, BillBUF
Maloney, BillyROC
Manion, GeorgeCOL
Manning, Rube
(Batting)
NY
(AL)
Manning, Rube
(Pitching)
NY
(AL)
Marquard, Rube
(Hands At Side)
NY
(NL)
Marquard, Rube
(Pitching)
NY
(NL)
undefinedMarquard, Rube
(Portrait)
NY
(NL)
Marshall, DocBRO
Mathewson, Christy
(Dark Cap)
NY
(NL)
undefinedMathewson, Christy
(Portrait)
NY
(NL)
Mathewson, Christy
(White Cap)
NY
(NL)
Mattern, AlBOS
(NL)
McAleese, JohnSTL
(AL)
McBride, GeorgeWAS
McCauley, PatPOR
McCormick, MooseNY
(NL)
McElveen, PryorBRO
undefinedMcGann, DanMIL
McGinley, JimTOR
McGinnity, JoeNWK
McGlynn, StoneyMIL
undefinedMcGraw, John
(Finger In Air)
NY
(NL)
undefinedMcGraw, John
(Glove At Hip)
NY
(NL)
undefinedMcGraw, John
(Portrait – No Cap)
NY
(NL)
undefinedMcGraw, John
(Portrait – With Cap)
NY
(NL)
McIntyre, Harry
(BRO)
BRO
undefinedMcIntyre, Harry
(BRO & CHI)
BRO/CHI
McIntyre, MattyDET
McLean, LarryCIN
McQuillan, George
(Ball In Hand)
PHI
(NL)
McQuillan, George
(With Bat)
PHI
(NL)
undefinedMerkle, Fred
(Portrait)
NY
(NL)
Merkle, Fred
(Throwing)
NY
(NL)
Merritt, GeorgeJC
Meyers, ChiefNY
(NL)
Milan, ClydeWAS
Miller, DotsPIT
Miller, MollyDAL
Milligan, BillJC
Mitchell, FredTOR
Mitchell, MikeCIN
Moeller, DanJC
Molesworth, CarltonBIR
Moran, HerbiePRO
Moran, PatCHI
(NL)
Moriarty, GeorgeDET
Mowrey, MikeCIN
Mullaney, DomJAX
Mullin
(UER Mullen), George
(Portrait)
DET
Mullin, George
(Throwing)
DET
undefinedMullin, George
(With Bat)
DET
Murphy, Danny
(Batting)
PHI
(AL)
Murphy, Danny
(Throwing)
PHI
(AL)
Murray, Red
(Batting)
NY
(NL)
Murray, Red
(Portrait)
NY
(NL)
Myers, Chief
(Batting)
NY
(NL)
Myers, Chief
(Fielding)
NY
(NL)
Nattress, BillyBUF
Needham, TomCHI
(NL)
Nicholls, Simon
(Hands On Knees)
PHI
(AL)
Nichols, Simon
(Batting)
PHI
(AL)
Niles, HarryBOS
(AL)
Oakes, RebelCIN
Oberlin, FrankMIN
O’Brien, PeterSTP
O’Hara, Bill
(NY)
NY
(NL)
O’Hara, Bill
(STL)
STL
(NL)
Oldring, Rube
(Batting)
PHI
(AL)
Oldring, Rube
(Fielding)
PHI
(AL)
undefinedO’Leary, Charley
(Hands On Knees)
DET
O’Leary, Charley
(Portrait)
DET
O’Neil, William J.MIN
Orth, AlLYN
Otey, WilliamNOR
Overall, Orval
(Hand At Face Level)
CHI
(NL)
Overall, Orval
(Hands Waist Level)
CHI
(NL)
Overall, Orval
(Portrait)
CHI
(NL)
Owen, FrankCHI
(AL)
Paige, GeorgeCHA
undefinedParent, FredCHI
(AL)
Paskert, DodeCIN
Pastorius, JimBRO
Pattee, HarryBRO
undefinedPayne, FredCHI
(AL)
Chicago Daily News, 1909
Pelty, Barney
(Horizontal)
STL
(AL)
Pelty, Barney
(Vertical)
STL
(AL)
Perdue, HubNAS
Perring, GeorgeCLE
Persons, ArchMTGM
Pfeffer, FrancisCHI
(NL)
Pfeister, Jake
(Seated)
CHI
(NL)
Pfeister, Jake
(Throwing)
CHI
(NL)
Phelan, JimmyPRO
Phelps, EddieSTL
(NL)
Phillippe, DeaconPIT
Pickering, OllieMIN
Plank, EddiePHI
(AL)
Poland, PhilBAL
Powell, JackSTL
(AL)
Powers, MikePHI
(AL)
Purtell, BillyCHI
(AL)
Puttman, AmbroseLOU
Quillen, LeeMIN
Quinn, JackNY
(AL)
Randall, NewtMIL
Raymond, BugsNY
(NL)
Reagan, EdNOLA
Reulbach, Ed
(Glove Showing)
CHI
(NL)
Reulbach, Ed
(No Glove Showing)
CHI
(NL)
Revelle, DutchRIC
Rhoades, Bob
(Hands At Chest)
CLE
Rhoades, Bob
(Right Arm Extended)
CLE
Rhodes, CharlieSTL
(NL)
Ritchey, ClaudeBOS
(NL)
Ritter, LouKC
Rockenfeld, IkeMTGM
Rossman, ClaudeDET
Rucker, Nap
(Portrait)
BRO
Rucker, Nap
(Throwing)
BRO
Rudolph, DickTOR
Ryan, RayROA
Schaefer, Germany
(DET)
DET
Schaefer, Germany
(WAS)
WAS
Schirm, GeorgeBUF
Schlafly, LarryNWK
Schlei, Admiral
(Batting)
NY
(NL)
Schlei, Admiral
(Catching)
NY
(NL)
Schlei, Admiral
(Portrait)
NY
(NL)
Schmidt, Boss
(Portrait)
DET
Schmidt, Boss
(Throwing)
DET
Schreck, OsseeCOL
undefinedSchulte, Wildfire
(Back View)
CHI
(NL)
Schulte, Wildfire
(Front View)
CHI
(NL)
Scott, JimCHI
(AL)
Seitz, CharlesNOR
Seymour, Cy
(Batting)
NY
(NL)
Seymour, Cy
(Portrait)
NY
(NL)
Seymour, Cy
(Throwing)
NY
(NL)
Shannon, SpikeKC
Sharpe, BudNWK
undefinedShaughnessy, ShagROA
Shaw, AlSTL
(NL)
Shaw, HunkyPRO
Sheckard, Jimmy
(Glove Showing)
CHI
(NL)
Sheckard, Jimmy
(No Glove Showing)
CHI
(NL)
Shipke, BillWAS
Slagle, JimmyBAL
Smith, CarlosSHRV
undefinedSmith, Frank
(F. Smith)
CHI
(AL)
Smith, Frank
(White Cap)
CHI
(AL)
Smith, Frank
(CHI & BOS)
CHI/BOS
Smith, HappyBRO
Smith, HeinieBUF
Smith, SidATL
Snodgrass, Fred
(Batting)
NY
(NL)
Snodgrass, Fred
(Catching)
NY
(NL)
Spade, BobCIN
undefinedSpeaker, TrisBOS
(AL)
Spencer, TubbyBOS
(AL)
Stahl, Jake
(Glove Shows)
BOS
(AL)
undefinedStahl, Jake
(No Glove Shows)
BOS
(AL)
Stanage, OscarDET
Stark, DollySAT
Starr, CharlieBOS
(NL)
Steinfeldt, Harry
(Portrait)
CHI
(NL)
Steinfeldt, Harry
(With Bat)
CHI
(NL)
Stephens, JimSTL
(AL)
Stone, GeorgeSTL
(AL)
Stovall, George
(Batting)
CLE
Stovall, George
(Portrait)
CLE
Strang, SamBAL
Street, Gabby
(Catching)
WAS
Street, Gabby
(Portrait)
WAS
Sullivan, BillyCHI
(AL)
Summers, EdDET
Sweeney, BillBOS
(NL)
Sweeney, JeffNY
(AL)
Tannehill, JesseWAS
Tannehill, Lee
(L. Tannehill On Front)
CHI
(AL)
Tannehill, Lee
(Tannehill On Front)
CHI
(AL)
undefinedTaylor, DummyBUF
undefinedTenney, FredNY
(NL)
Thebo, TonyWAC
Thielman, JakeLOU
Thomas, IraPHI
(AL)
Thornton, WoodieMOB
Tinker, Joe
(Bat Off Shoulder)
CHI
(NL)
Tinker, Joe
(Bat On Shoulder)
CHI
(NL)
Tinker, Joe
(Hands On Knees)
CHI
(NL)
Tinker, Joe
(Portrait)
CHI
(NL)
Titus, JohnPHI
(NL)
Turner, TerryCLE
Unglaub, BobWAS
Violat, JuanJAX
Waddell, Rube
(Portrait)
STL
(AL)
Waddell, Rube
(Throwing)
STL
(AL)
Wagner, Heinie
(Bat On Left Shoulder)
BOS
(AL)
Wagner, Heinie
(Bat On Right Shoulder)
BOS
(AL)
Wagner, HonusPIT
Wallace, BobbySTL
(AL)
Walsh, EdCHI
(AL)
Warhop, JackNY
(AL)
Weimer, JakeNY
(NL)
Westlake, JamesDAN
Wheat, ZackBRO
White, Doc
(Pitching)
CHI
(AL)
undefinedWhite, Doc
(Portrait)
CHI
(AL)
White, FoleyHOU
White, JackBUF
Wilhelm, Kaiser
(Hands At Chest)
BRO
Wilhelm, Kaiser
(With Bat)
BRO
Willett, EdDET
Willetts, Ed
(UER)
DET
Williams, JimmySTL
(AL)
Willis, Vic
(Portrait)
PIT
Willis, Vic
(Batting)
STL
(NL)
Willis, Vic
(Throwing)
STL
(NL)
Wilson, OwenPIT
undefinedWiltse, Hooks
(Pitching)
NY
(NL)
Harwell Collection (1904)
undefinedWiltse, Hooks
(Portrait – No Cap)
NY
(NL)
Wiltse, Hooks
(Portrait – With Cap)
NY
(NL)
Wright, LuckyTOL
Young, Cy
(With Glove)
CLE
Young, Cy
(Bare Hand)
CLE
Young, Cy
(Portrait)
CLE
Young, IrvMIN
Zimmerman, HeinieCHI
(NL)
Checklist based on T206Resource.com and unmatched card images from Trading Card Database

If you have additions to the project, please let us know in the comments. You can also use our Contact form or tag us on Twitter @sabrbbcards. Finally, for related card-photo matching projects see–

Creating Your Own Cards with the Rookies App

It is scary out there. And probably not the best time for a post, but writing helps me keep sane during these trying times. I also thought that there might be a few of you looking for a diversion as we shelter in place.

One of the posts that I read when I first came across this blog was by Nick Vossbrink about creating your own baseball cards. I thought that was a pretty cool thing to do and was very impressed by the images of the creations in the post. In the post Nick mentioned that Matt Prigge was using the Rookies App to create his cards, so I decided to give it a try.

I downloaded Rookies App from the Apple App Store (it is free) and installed it on my iPhone.

Overview of the Rookies App

The Rookies App is extremely easy to use.

To get started you click on the Create Your Own button. A template pops up, but you can change it by tapping on the 4 small squares at the bottom left of the screen. From there you can choose from 24 templates. In each template there will be a plus sign button or buttons (some templates allow you to have 2 images on a card) for uploading images. You can choose images stored in you photo library on your phone, take a photo with you camera and use that image, or choose photos from your Facebook library (you will need to sync the app with Facebook library). You can resize the image by pinching up or down on your photo.

Once you choose you image or images you can enter text in the various fields on the front of the by tapping the Aa letters at the bottom of the screen. By tapping the ink dropper icon on the bottom of the screen you can change the colors used in the template that you have selected. You can even add information on the back of the card by tapping on the icon with 2 boxes. This will allow you select one of 5 different template to add information to the card.

You will also need to enter information for a credit card if you want to order cards. You order 20 cards at a time. The price with shipping and taxes is $16.99 (will vary slightly depending on where you live). 

Once you place your order you will get your cards in about 10 days. The cards arrive in packs of 20.

The quality of the cards are excellent.

Unopened pack of 20 cards.

Using Published Photos

There are tons of possibilities for utilizing already published photos of players for your cards – magazines, picture books, scorecards, yearbooks, etc. I have found that if you have a steady hand and a smart phone with a good built-in camera that you can take photos of published pictures that are fine for your cards. A few things to keep in mind are to make sure the image is as flat as possible and that there are no shadows.

Included below are some cards from my Pittsburgh Pirates Team Set using photos from the 1979 Pirates Yearbook.

Photos copied from 1979 Pittsburg Pirates Yearbook.

Using Original Photos

I enjoy taking photos and the Rookies App allows me to merge my two hobbies – photography and baseball cards. I have included below some of my favorite cards that I have made using photos that I have taken. Under each card are some details about the picture.

Taken during Pittsburgh Pirates Fantasy Camp in Bradenton, Florida.
Taken at Pittsburgh Pirates Fantasy Camp in Bradenton, Florida.
Taken during Pittsburgh Pirates Fantasy Camp in Bradenton, Florida.
Elroy was one of the former players signing at a card show outside of Pittsburgh. Luckily I had a baseball with me and I asked him to show me how he used to grip the fork ball.
Manny Ramirez and David Ortiz warming up prior to a Spring Training in 2004 against the Pittsburgh Pirates at McKechnie Field (now LECOM Park)in Bradenton, Florida.
A good friend of mine is a Red Sox season ticket holder and invited me to go with him to the pre-Duck Boat parade World Series celebration inside Fenway Park in 2013. In this photo Big Papi proudly displays his World Series Championship belt while standing on top of the Red Sox dugout. Note the Duck Boat in the background.
In a scheduling fluke that will probably never happen again in my lifetime the Red Sox opening series in 2017 was against the Pittsburgh Pirates. Captured this photo of my favorite current player from my seat near the Red Sox dugout.

Take care and be safe.