“It’s My Turn”

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On the subject of onscreen baseball cards, IT’S MY TURN (1980) is the story of Ben Lewin (Michael Douglas), a recently-retired ballplayer. The film may primarily be about the crisis of a modern woman (played by Jill Clayburgh) as she realizes she is no longer a child in her father’s house, etc. But if you ever wondered what Michael Douglas would look like on a baseball card, this is the movie for you… (In one of the film’s publicity stills,  Clayburgh’s right arm is around Douglas– and she is clutching a Topps Ben Lewin baseball card. It’s hard to make out the year.)

What Condition My Condition Was In

I’m not a stickler for condition. For the cards I’ve collected on my own, I like them Near Mint (NM), maybe EX-MT. It’s more important to me that the picture is sharp than that the corners are. I’m not bothered by off-center cards, slightly bothered by miscuts. All my sets are in pretty solid shape.

Then there are the cards I’ve gotten from other people over the years. Those tend to be more hit or miss. Not everyone put their cards straight from the pack into a shoe box or plastic sleeve. Some of the cards I’ve picked up from friends are nice, maybe EX or better; some look like they’ve been driven over by a car in a rough, cement-floored garage.

It’s the latter conditions I grappled with when I decided to finish my 1971 set. 1971 was the last year I let my mother (yes, let) throw out my cards. She would ask if I wanted them anymore and I, shockingly, told her no. Over time I reacquired a bunch of those, but in conditions that made me wince.

But when I looked and saw I only needed 57 cards to complete the set, I figured, what the hell, I’ll go for it, but I’ll go for it with cards in similar condition to the rest of what I had. Not only was pursuing 1971’s in Very Good (VG) condition a cheaper choice, it was also a liberating one. I didn’t have to worry if the corners were pointy enough, if the borders were as close to solid black as they could be (a notorious 1971 problem), if the cards were relatively well-centered. Once I finished the set, I was thrilled by it, happy to have them all, less concerned about the state of any individual card. I can tell you my Rich Morales (267) is a crime against collecting. Some slight upgrading is in order.

morales

With 1971 wrapped up, I turned to 1970, the last set I didn’t have that I was reasonably close to. In mid-July, I assessed the situation. I needed 187 cards to complete the set, lots of high numbers, some big stars too. Whoever at Topps put Nolan Ryan at #712 should be subject to enhanced interrogation.

ryan

Again, I had some condition problems, but, if I went after VG or EX, I could get this done reasonably and that’s what I’ve done. Starting with a solid nab of 25 cards at the great Baseball Nostalgia in Doubleday Court, Cooperstown, I was well on my way. Then I tweeted that I was working on this set and, lo and behold, prayers, had they been said, were answered. Two friends (Chris and Mike) gave me significant piles of their 1970’s. Not only did these windfalls fill a lot of holes, but they allowed me to upgrade to a more EX set.

I’ve been working the old eBay machine for the rest. While I miss the fun of card shows (there aren’t any to speak of in the greater Cooperstown area), I don’t miss haggling with dealers. I’m eminently patient and will wait out losing auction upon losing auction until I get my price. There’s a fun to buying on EBay, a different entertainment than shows. Swooping in at the last moment to get a good deal makes me feel, for no valid reason, a bit smarter. With much good fortune, I picked up a lot of EX-NM cards at VG prices. I’ve also been selling some doubles and triples to subsidize the endeavor. I’ve had a lot of fun with this, which is sort of the point of card collecting.

As of this post, I need only three cards – Johnny Bench (660), Ron Santo (670) and the Pilots team card (713, Nolan’s neighbor). I’m almost there.

Yeah, yeah, oh yeah!

 

 

Josh Wilker’s Cardboard Gods

One of my favorite blogs is Josh Wilker’s Cardboard Gods.  Josh takes a different slant than most baseball card blogs, which are mainly nostalgia.  Josh uses one card to help tell some (often quite personal, sometimes funny and/or emotional) story about his own life, or about the world around him.

Several years ago he took some of his blog content, added several new entries, and turned out a book, also called Cardboard Gods. I highly recommend the book as well.

Note that we have a Blogroll over to the lower right.  If you have any other blogs that are worthy of promotion via SABR’s Baseball Cards committee, let’s add them.  Also, feel free to post about them as well.

— Mark

 

Bruce Markusen’s Card Corner

For those of you who don’t know, Bruce Markusen writes a column devoted to baseball cards (usually focusing on a single card) for the Hall of Fame web site.  He has a new entry today, which is on the 1968 Don Mincher card.

Bruce is a member of this committee, but even if he wasn’t I would recommend giving his column a read.  At the very bottom of the page there are some links to earlier entries, but you might need Google to find the rest.

— Mark

 

Just in Time for Christmas

I am always making a Christmas list for my family – no need for them to get me things I don’t need or sizes from eons ago. The top of the list every year is Topps cards – I used to ask for the upcoming season, but as my collection has grown, anything they get me is thoroughly enjoyed.

This year, there is something specific: Topps Transcendent Collection.

https://www.topps.com/blog/nearly-40-great-names-included-in-2016-topps-transcendent-collection-baseball-final-checklist/

That looks incredible! The reviews are amazing, but so is the price tag.

Topps Transcendent Will Be Most Expensive Baseball Cards Ever Made

http://www.beckett.com/news/2016-topps-transcendent-baseball/

Retail prices haven’t been seen (by me). Release date is December 9, in case anyone wants to get me and Mark something for getting the blog moving…

Autographed cards

A friend of mine is trying to put together a complete set of autographed 1968s (at least I think they are 1968s). Its something that I always wondered about  -how does anyone chase down the gold insert sets, or the Target Red sets, or get a full autographed set?

Obviously money is a key player, but it is time and dedication well beyond opening pack after pack to collate a 2016 set.

I was amazed to discover you could collect *this autographed set:
http://www.sportsartifacts.com/aagpblcards.html

Impressive.